General Information

This document is the central location for terms and conventions for technical language in Red Hat’s product documentation and other technical content. It was created by the Documentation Conventions project team as part of the Customer Content Services FY17 Quality Initiative, and supplements The IBM Style Guide, which is the main reference for technical terms and conventions used at Red Hat.

While several other resources also define technical terms and conventions, this document was created to be an official resource maintained by Red Hat Customer Content Services that is easy to update and maintain, that contains all of the general and product-specific terms used by documentation teams, and that is available to all associates at Red Hat. This document has incorporated all the terms in the Writing Style Guide, with the exception of those that appear in The IBM Style Guide already, and also includes terms specific to Red Hat products.

Several general and product-specific terms have been added already, but this document is still a work in progress, and all associates and community members are encouraged to make contributions at any time.

How to Update This Document

This document is written in the AsciiDoc markup language and hosted in a git repository at GitHub.

You can edit this document by using:

Once you are done with the edits, create a pull request. See Creating Pull Requests for details.

If you want to suggest an update for this document, have a general question, or want to start a discussion, open a new issue. For details, see [submitting-issues].

Before You Begin

The Glossary of Terms and Conventions for Product Documentation is stored in a GitHub repository and written in AsciiDoc. You need:

  • A GitHub account.

  • A working knowledge of GitHub.

  • Access to the Glossary of Terms and Conventions for Product Documentation repository

Send an email to Chris Budzilowicz(cbudzilo@redhat.com) requesting access to the Glossary of Terms and Conventions for Product Documentation Project on GitHub. Please give us your GitHub username and use the following subject line: REQUESTING ACCESS

Web UI: Adding and Editing Entries

Note

Before you start, ensure that you are logged in to GitHub.

  1. Create a new branch.

    1. On the main repository page click the plus button and select New branch.

    2. Specify the name of the branch. When adding a new entry, use wip-<name-of-the-entry> as the branch name, for example wip-host-name. When updating an existing entry, use wip-<name-of-the-entry>-edits as the branch name, for example wip-host-name-edits.

    3. Click Create branch.

  2. Edit the document.

    1. Navigate to the general_conventions or product_conventions directory and select the file you want to add the entry to. If a file for the product does not exist yet, create one. Use the <product-name>.adoc form, for example red-hat-virtualization.adoc.

    2. Ensure that you are in the correct branch. The branch name is listed at the beginning of the path to the file. If you are not in the correct branch, select it from the menu.

    3. Click Edit.

    4. Make the changes. Use this template when adding a new entry. Entries must be added in alphabetical order.

    5. If you created a new file, add the file to the master.adoc file. Add the file in alphabetical order under the == Product-specific Conventions heading. For example:

       include::{includedir}/products_conventions/red-hat-virtualization.adoc[]
  3. Commit the changes.

    1. Update the commit message. Be descriptive enough, "Updated the <filename> file." is not a good commit message. Use something like "Added the <entry-name> entry" or "Fixed a typo in the <entry-name> entry".

    2. Click Commit Changes.

  4. If you want to make additional changes, edit the file again and commit the changes.

  5. Once you are done updating the document, create a pull request. See Creating Pull Requests for details.

CLI: Adding and Editing Entries

  1. Clone a local copy of the glossary-of-terms-and-conventions-for-product-documentation git repository:

    $ git clone git@github.com:redhat-documentation/glossary-of-terms-and-conventions-for-product-documentation.git
  2. Navigate to the cloned repository.

    $ cd glossary-of-terms-and-conventions-for-product-documentation/
  3. Set the upstream repository.

    $ git remote add upstream git@github.com:redhat-documentation/glossary-of-terms-and-conventions-for-product-documentation.git
  4. Fetch the latest changes from the upstream repository.

    $ git fetch upstream
  5. Create a new branch from the upstream master branch. When adding a new entry, use wip-<name-of-the-entry> as the branch name, for example wip-host-name. When updating an existing entry, use wip-<name-of-the-entry>-edits as the branch name, for example wip-host-name-edits.

    $ git checkout -b <name-of-the-branch> upstream/master
  6. Edit the document.

    1. Navigate to the general_conventions/ or products_conventions/ directory and open the file you want to add the entry to. If a file for the product does not exist yet, create one. Use the <product-name>.adoc form, for example red-hat-virtualization.adoc.

    2. Make the changes. Use this template when adding a new entry. Entries must be added in alphabetical order.

    3. If you created a new file, add the file to the master.adoc file. Add the file in alphabetical order under the == Product-specific Conventions heading. For example:

      include::{includedir}/products_conventions/red-hat-virtualization.adoc[]
  7. Stage the changes.

    $ git add <file>

    You can use the git status command to see all the files that have changed.

  8. Commit the changes. Be descriptive enough in the commit message, "Updated the <filename> file." is not a good commit message. Use something like "Added the <entry-name> entry" or "Fixed a typo in the <entry-name> entry".

    $ git commit -m "<commit-message>"
  9. Push the changes.

    $ git push origin HEAD
  10. Open a pull request. See Creating Pull Requests for details.

Creating Pull Requests

  1. Navigate to the main repository page and click Pull Requests.

  2. Click New pull request.

  3. Select the source branch from the drop-down list.

  4. Click Compare branches and continue.

  5. Click Remove the WIP: prefix from the title.

  6. Optionally, write a description of your change.

  7. Select the correct label; General Conventions or Product-specific Conventions.

  8. Click Submit pull request.

Template for Entries

Use the following template for entries:

The AsciiDoc source:

[discrete]
[[<id>]]
==== <term> (<class>)
*Description*: <description>

*Use it*: <yes/no/with caution>

*Incorrect forms*: <incorrect-form>

*See also*: xref:<another-term-id>[<another-term>]
Replace With Notes

<id>

The term in lowercase.

If the term consists of more than one word, separate them with a hyphen ("-"). Do not use spaces, capital letters, or special characters (for example, slash "/") in the ID. If two entries could possibly have the same ID, see What to do if two entries have the same ID?

<term>

The term to be described.

<description>

The description of the term.

Use full sentences with periods. If a term has more than one meaning, use numbers to separate them. For an example, see the media entry. Add information about why we should use the term in this form. If we should not use the term, explain why. Alternatively, explain why the terms listed in the Incorrect forms field are incorrect.

<yes/no/with caution>

"yes" if the term should be used.

"no" if the term should not be used.

"with caution" if the term should be used sporadically or only in certain cases.

Explain why we should or should not use the term in the Description field.

<class>

The part of speech of the term.

Possible values: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, conjunction, preposition. Use noun for acronyms or abbreviations. Leave the field empty for symbols.

<incorrect-form>

The form of the term that we should not use.

If there are multiple incorrect forms, separate them with a comma (",").

<another-term-id>

The ID of another term related to this one.

Always verify that this ID already exists in the document; otherwise, it will fail to validate if the ID does not exist. Do not include a space between <another-term-id> and [<another-term>].

<another-term>

The term related to this one.

To link to another document or a web page, replace xref:<another-term-id>[<another-term>] with <link>[<name-of-the-document/web-page>].

Important
  • Do not combine two terms into one entry.

  • Keep all fields, even if a field is empty. An empty field serves as a placeholder if the field is required later.

  • Use quotation marks on the first occurrence of a term in the Description field. Do not include an acronym in parentheses within the quotation marks; for example, "Asynchronous Transfer Mode" (ATM) is a network technology based on transferring data in cells or packets of a fixed size.

  • If the Description field contains more than one paragraph, only the last paragraph is displayed in the Atom linter’s text. Ensure that word usage advice is contained in the last paragraph.

  • Use single lines with no breaks for each paragraph. That is, in a text editor, it looks like this:

    1   *Description*: This text is on a single
    *   line with no line breaks.

    Instead of this:

    1   *Description*: This text is broken
    2   across multiple lines.
  • If the term has a correct and an incorrect form, always use the correct form instead of <term> and list the incorrect form in the Incorrect forms field. Remember to explain why the incorrect form is incorrect in the Description field.

  • If you want to add a term that we should not use and that does not have a correct form, use the incorrect version instead of <term> and add "no" to the Use it field. Explain why we should not use that term in the Description field.

  • If you want to list a term in the Product-specific Conventions chapter that is already included in the General Conventions chapter, add the product-specific meaning to the Description field of the term in General Conventions. Use numbers to separate the meanings. In Product-specific Conventions add the following boilerplate text with a link to the entry in General Conventions:

    ==== <term> (<class>)
    See xref:<id-in-general-conventions>[<term>] in the _General Conventions_ chapter.
Example
[discrete]
[[ceph]]
==== Ceph (noun)
*Description*: Ceph is a unified, distributed storage system designed for excellent performance, reliability, and scalability.

*Use it*: yes

*Incorrect forms*: CEPH, ceph

*See also*: xref:red-hat-ceph-storage[Red Hat Ceph Storage]

For the rendered output see Ceph.

Reviewers' Checklist

Table 1. Technical Documentation Reviewers' Checklist

Does the entry adhere to the template?

Is this entry unique, that is, not already included in Red Hat’s Glossary of Terms and Conventions for Product Documentation?

Is this entry unique, that is, not included in The IBM Style Guide? Here is an abridged version of The IBM Style Guide. Consult the full edition to be sure.

Does the entry include only one term?

If the entry has two class variants, for example noun and verb, are the entries for noun and verb separate?

Are the IDs in the correct format? ID instructions from the template: <id> with the term in lowercase, if the term consists of more than one word, separate them with a hyphen ("-"). Do not use spaces, capital letters, or special characters (for example, slash ["/"]) in this name. If two entries have the same ID, see What to do if two entries have the same ID?.

Does the Description field include a definition of the entry?

Are there complete sentences in the Description field?

If there is more than one paragraph in the Description field, is the usage information in the last paragraph?

Is each paragraph on a single line with no breaks?

Is the document free of typographic errors?

Is the document free of misspellings?

Does the entry includes all fields (even the empty ones)?

General Guidance

  • Use GitHub to review the files.

    • Anyone who would like to add an entry should create a pull request.

    • Reviewers should comment directly in the Pull Requests.

    • Resolve discussions in the Pull Requests, so you will know what else needs to be resolved.

    • Once you have verified that the file is ready to go, you can accept the pull request.

Note

See the How to update this document section for information on editing the document and submitting changes to GitHub.

Submitting Issues

The preferred way to update this document is to open a pull request as described in [how-to-update-this-document]. However, you can also submit an issue. Issues are useful in the following scenarios:

  • You spotted an error in the guide but you do not know how to fix it.

  • You want to add a missing entry but you do not know all the information required in [template-for-entries].

  • You have a general question and want to start a discussion.

To open an issue:

  1. Log in to GitHub. Use your Kerberos credentials or the Red Hat SAML Login.

  2. Navigate to the Issues page.

  3. Click New Issue.

  4. Fill in the empty fields. Title and Description are compulsory.

  5. Click Submit issue.

FAQ

This section outlines answers to common questions about this document and the process for submitting contributions or suggesting changes.

What kind of terms and conventions does this document describe?

This document describes two main types of terms and conventions:

  • General Conventions

    General Conventions outlines conventions that are not specific to a product or solution, including general technical terminology and usage.

  • Product-specific Conventions

    Product-specific Conventions outlines conventions that are specific to a product or solution, including variations on and guidelines regarding the use of product and component names. In principle, the terms and conventions in this chapter must be specific to Red Hat products.

Who can contribute to this document?

There are no restrictions on who is allowed to contribute to this document. All associates are welcome to contribute new terms or conventions, or suggest updates to or removal of existing terms and conventions at any time.

How can I contribute to this document?

See [how-to-update-this-document].

How can I suggest an update to this document or start a discussion?

Open an issue. See [submitting-issues].

Are there any reasons a contribution might not be accepted?

All contributions are welcome, but reviewers might decline contributions that fall under the following:

  • Terms or conventions that are considered part of the general sphere of professional writing, such as basic grammar and punctuation.

  • Terms or conventions that are already included in The IBM Style Guide.

What if two entries have the same ID?

When creating IDs in accordance with the rules described in [template-for-entries], the resulting IDs might be the same as those for separate entries. For example, the "kernel space" and "kernel-space" entries, or the "kB" and "KB" entries would have the same anchor tag ("kernel-space" and "kb"). If the IDs are not unique, however, it will cause an error in the document.

To avoid this issue, use different IDs:

  • For entries that have different class, append:

    • n for nouns (kernel-space-n)

    • v for verbs

    • adj for adjectives (kernel-space-adj)

    • adv for adverbs

    • conj for conjunctions

    • prep for prepositions

  • For different entries with the same name, for example a command and a program or a programming language of the same name, append command to the command ID, for example ceph-command.

  • For entries that differ in spelling, for example "kB" and "KB", preserve the letter case.

    Raise an issue if in doubt. See [submitting-issues] for details.

Merge Request Workflow

What Happens to My pull request?

Table 2. What happens to my pull request?
These people or this system…​ Complete(s) these tasks . . .

The designated repository administrator

  • Processes the pull request.

  • Notifies all designated reviewers by using email after five Pull Requests have been submitted or at the end of 2 weeks, if the quota has not been reached.

Reviewers

Evaluate the changes. Review options include live meetings or online reviews. The reviewers reach a decision when a clear majority of reviewers agree on what to do with each pull request.

The designated repository administrator

Accepts, denies, or asks for changes to the pull request. The administrator might make small changes, for example, for template conformity, before accepting the pull request.

GitHub

Automatically notifies the requester of the outcome of the pull request, including if the reviewers need more information.

Requester

Makes any requested changes to the content and re-submits the request.

The designated repository administrator

Approves the pull request.

CCS associates

Ask questions by following the procedure outlined below.

The designated repository administrator

  • Processes the pull request.

  • Notifies all designated reviewers via email after five issues have been submitted or at the end of 2 weeks, if the quota has not been reached.

Reviewers

Consensus is reached when a clear majority of participants agree on the issue’s determination.

The designated repository administrator

Provides a response to the issue’s author, if applicable.

This table provides additional information for adding, revising, or deleting product-specific terms.

Table 3. What happens to my product-specific pull request?
These people or this system…​ Complete(s) these tasks . . .

A product docs team member

For an initial set of conventions, reviews the entries and agrees that they are sound.

A designated member of the Documentation Conventions project

Reviews the pull request for template conformity and other issues.

A designated member of the Documentation Conventions project

Merges the request when it is ready. The administrator might make small changes, for example, for template conformity, before accepting the pull request.

General Conventions

A

absolute path (noun)

Description: The location of a file or directory from the root directory (/). Provides all information to locate a file or directory.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

agnostic (adjective)

Description: "Agnostic" denotes or relates to hardware or software that is compatible with many types of platforms or operating systems. For example, many common file formats (JPEG, MP3, and others) are platform agnostic. Use "neutral" instead.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

air gap (noun)

Description: "Air gap" is the physical segregation and isolation of a system as a security measure.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: air wall

See also:

alright (adjective)

Description: "Alright" is the colloquial form of "correct" or "as expected."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

AMD64 (noun)

Description: "AMD64" is the AMD implementation of the x86 architecture.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Hammer, x86_64, x86-64, x64, 64-bit x86

See also:

Note

The AMD64 logo is trademarked; the term "AMD64" is not trademarked. For more information about AMD trademarks, see the AMD Trademark Information page.

For more information about Intel® trademarks, see the Trademark Information and Usage Guidelines for Customers, Licensees, and Other Third Parties pages.

app (noun)

Description: Acceptable when referring to a mobile or web application.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: app.

See also:

Applixware (noun)

Description: "Applixware" is a suite of proprietary modular applications for Linux.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Applix, ApplixWare

See also:

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (noun)

Description: "Asynchronous Transfer Mode" (ATM) is a network technology based on transferring data in cells or packets of a fixed size. The cell size used with ATM is relatively small compared to units used with older technologies.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

auto-detect (verb)

Description: "Auto-detect" means to automatically detect threats, new hardware, software updates, and so on.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: autodetect

See also:

B

backtrace (noun)

Description: "Backtrace" is another name for "stack trace" (or "stack backtrace"), which is a report of the active stack frames (function calls) at a certain point in time during the execution of a program. The Python programming language uses the term "traceback," possibly because the stack frames are printed in the opposite order of those presented by gdb, the GNU Debugger. "Traceback" is the preferred term when referring to a Python stack trace.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

bandwidth (noun)

Description: "Bandwidth" refers to a range within a band of frequencies or wavelengths, or the amount of data that can be transmitted in a fixed amount of time.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: latency

bare metal (noun)

Description: "Bare metal" refers to physical hardware as opposed to virtual hardware. Use the two-word form as a noun: "Install on bare metal."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: baremetal, bare-metal

bare-metal (adjective)

Description: "Bare metal" refers to physical hardware as opposed to virtual hardware. Use the hyphenated form as an adjective: "Bare-metal servers."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: baremetal, bare metal

See also: bare metal (noun)

basically (adverb)

Description: "Basically" is another term for "in principle" or "fundamentally."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

because (conjunction)

Description: Do not use "since" to mean "because." Use "because" to refer to a reason. Use "since" to indicate the passage of time.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

big data (noun)

Description: "Big data" refers to extremely large sets of data that can be analyzed to determine trends and other information.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Big Data, Big-Data, big-data

See also:

bimodal IT (noun)

Description: "Bimodal IT" is the Gartner phrase for the combination of traditional (mode 1 or type 1) and modern (mode 2 or type 2) IT infrastructure and resources. There are many ways to talk about this combination approach. Using only the Gartner term can alienate other analysts or those not familiar with Gartner’s phrasing.

The practice of having both modes together is often referred to as "hybrid," "agile," or "modern" IT. "Hybrid IT" is a more general term; for example, it could mean "on-premise plus public cloud." "Agile" and "modern IT" can both carry an implication of "mode 2." When using those terms, be specific about the exact technology combination you mean.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

bimonthly (adverb)

Description: "Bimonthly" means every other month.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bi-monthly

See also:

biweekly (adverb)

Description: "Biweekly" means every other week.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bi-weekly

See also:

BIND (noun)

Description: Use "BIND" when referring to the DNS software.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Bind, bind

See also:

BIOS (noun)

Description: "BIOS" is an abbreviation for basic input and output system. The plural form is "BIOSes."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Bios

See also:

bit rate (noun)

Description: "Bit rate" is the number of bits per second that can be transmitted or processed.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bitrate

See also:

boot disk (noun)

Description: A "boot disk" is a disk used to start a computer.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: boot diskette

See also:

boot loader (noun)

Description: "Boot loader" is software used to load an operating system when a computer is started.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bootloader

See also:

bottleneck (noun)

Description: A "bottleneck" is a limitation in the capacity of software or hardware caused by a single component.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bottle neck, bottle-neck

See also:

bpp (noun)

Description: The acronym for bits per pixel ("bpp") is presented in lowercase letters, unless it is at the beginning of a sentence. Use a non-breaking space between the numeral and the units, for example, "16 bpp," not "16bpp."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Bps (noun)

Description: "Bps" is an acronym for bytes per second.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bps

See also: bps

bps (noun)

Description: The acronym for bits per second is "bps."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Bps

See also: Bps

broadcast (noun)

Description: When used as a noun, a "broadcast" is a message sent simultaneously to multiple recipients. Broadcasting is a useful feature in email systems. It is also supported by some fax systems. In networking, a distinction is made between broadcasting and multicasting. Broadcasting sends a message to everyone on the network, whereas multicasting sends a message to a select list of recipients.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: broad cast, broad-cast

See also: broadcast (verb)

broadcast (verb)

Description: When used as a verb, "broadcast" means to simultaneously send the same message to multiple recipients. Broadcasting is a useful feature in email systems. It is also supported by some fax systems. In networking, a distinction is made between broadcasting and multicasting. Broadcasting sends a message to everyone on the network, whereas multicasting sends a message to a select list of recipients.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: broad cast, broad-cast

See also: broadcast (noun)

Btrfs (noun)

Description: "Btrfs" is a copy-on-write file system for Linux. Use a capital "B" when referring to the file system. When referring to tools, commands, and other utilities related to the file system, be faithful to those utilities. See the Btrfs wiki page for more information on this file system. See the List of file systems wiki page for a list of file system names and how to present them.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: btrfs

See also:

bug fix (noun)

Description: A "bug fix" is the resolution to a bug.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bugfix

See also:

built-in (adjective)

Description: Use "built-in" when referring to something that is included or incorporated into a larger unit.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: builtin, built in

See also:

C

CapEx (noun)

Description: "CapEx" is an acronym for "capital expenditures."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Capex, capex, capEx

See also:

cd (noun)

Description: The "change directory" command is "cd."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CD

See also: CD

CD (noun)

Description: "CD" is an acronym for "compact disc."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: cd

See also: cd, CDs

CD #1 (noun)

Description: When referring to a specific CD in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux CD set, it is correct to refer to it as "Red Hat Enterprise Linux CD #1." Avoid using "Red Hat Enterprise Linux CD 1."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CD 1

See also:

CD writer (noun)

Description: A "CD writer" is a device that records data into the CD format.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CD burner, burner

See also:

CDs (noun)

Description: "CDs" is the plural form of "CD." Use "CDs" to describe multiple compact discs.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CDS, Cds

See also: CD

cgroup (noun)

Description: The term "cgroup" is a contraction of "control group." Cgroups allow you to allocate resources, such as CPU time, system memory, network bandwidth, or combinations of these resources, among user-defined groups of processes running on a system.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CGroup, c group

See also:

ciphertext (noun)

Description: In cryptography, "ciphertext" is the result of encryption performed on plain text using an algorithm, called a cipher.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: cipher text, cyphertext, cypher text, cipher-text, cypher-text

See also:

client side (noun)

Description: Use the two-word form of "client side" as a noun when referring to the client side in a client-server relationship, for example, "This happens on the client side of the relationship."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: client-side

See also: client-side

client-side (adjective)

Description: Use the one-word form "client-side" as an adjective when referring to operations that are performed by the client in a client-server relationship, for example, "This is a client-side service."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: client side

See also: client side

cloud (adjective)

Description: Use "cloud" with a lowercase "c" when referring to cloud computing in a general sense.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Cloud

See also: cloud (noun)

cloud (noun)

Description: Use "cloud" with a lowercase "c" when referring to cloud computing in a general sense.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Cloud

See also: cloud (adjective)

cloudbursting (verb)

Description: "Cloudbursting" is an event where a private cloud exceeds its capacity and "bursts" into and uses public cloud resources.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: cloud-bursting

See also:

cloudwashing (verb)

Description: "Cloudwashing" is the process of rebranding legacy products to include the term "cloud" to increase their appeal to the cloud market.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: cloud-washing

See also:

cluster (noun)

Description: 1) A "cluster" is a collection of interconnected computers working together as an integrated computing resource. Clusters are referred to as the "High Availability Add-On" in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and later. 2) In OpenShift context, a "cluster" is the collection of controllers, pods, and services and related DNS and networking routing configuration that are defined on the system. Typically, a cluster is made up of multiple OpenShift hosts (masters, nodes, etc.) working together, across which the aforementioned components are distributed or running.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

code (noun)

Description: "Code" refers to programming statements and a set of instructions for a computer. Do not use "code" as a verb.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

colocate (verb)

Description: "Colocate" means to place two or more items in the same space. Do not hyphenate "colocate."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: co-locate, collocate

See also:

comma-delimited (adjective)

Description: "Comma-delimited" is an adjective that refers to a data format in which each piece of data is separated by a comma.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: comma delimited, commadelimited

See also:

comma-separated values (noun)

Description: "Comma-separated values" are a set of values in which each value is separated by a comma. Spell out "comma-separated values" on first use; use "CSV" thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: comma-delimited values, comma delimited values, comma separated values

See also: CSV

command-driven (adjective)

Description: "Command-driven" is an adjective that refers to programs and operating systems that accept commands in the form of special words or letters.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: command driven, commanddriven

See also: menu-driven

command language (noun)

Description: "Command language" is the programming language through which a user communicates with an operating system or an application.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: command-language

See also:

connectivity (noun)

Description: "Connectivity" is the ability of a program or device to link with other programs and devices.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

container (noun)

Description: 1) A "container" is the fundamental piece of an OpenShift application. A container is a way to isolate and limit process interactions with minimal overhead and footprint. In most cases, a container will be limited to a single process providing a specific service (for example web server, database). 2) A "container" in the Swift API contains objects. A container also defines access control lists (ACLs). Unlike folders or directories, a container cannot contain other containers. A "container" in the Swift API is synonymous with a "bucket" in the S3 API.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: bucket

container-based (adjective)

Description: Use "container-based" as an adjective when referring to applications made up of multiple services that are distributed in containers. "Container-based" can be used interchangeably with "containerized."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: container based

See also: containerized

containerized (adjective)

Description: Use "containerized" as an adjective when referring to applications made up of multiple services that are distributed in containers. "Containerized" can be used interchangeably with "container-based."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: containerised

See also: container-based

container registry (noun)

Description: A "container registry" refers to a service that stores and retrieves Docker-formatted container images. A "container registry" is also a registry that contains a collection of one or more image repositories. Each image repository contains one or more tagged images.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

control program (noun)

Description: A "control program" refers to a program that enhances an operating system by creating an environment in which you can run other programs.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

convert (verb)

Description: Use "convert" when referring to changing data from one format to another.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

cooked (adjective)

Description: "Cooked" is an adjective that refers to data that is processed before being passed to the I/O device.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: raw

Description: A "cookie" is a message given to a web browser by a web server. The browser stores the message in a text file called cookie.txt. The message is then sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from the server.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

crash (verb)

Description: When a program "crashes", it terminates unexpectedly. The IBM Style Guide suggests to use a more specific term, such as "fail". However, in Red Hat documentation, it is acceptable to use crash in certain cases: When writing errata descriptions, it is possible to use "crash" instead of "terminate unexpectedly" if "terminate unexpectedly" was used in a previous sentence. For example: A utility terminated unexpectedly because of a bug in the underlying source code. With this update, the utility no longer crashes.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: fail, terminate

cross-platform (adjective)

Description: Use "cross-platform" as an adjective when referring to the capability of software or hardware to run identically on different platforms.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: crossplatform, cross platform

See also:

cross-site scripting (adjective)

Description: Use "cross-site scripting" as an adjective when referring to "cross-site scripting" attacks. Another acceptable use is "cross-site scripting" (XSS) attack.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: cross site scripting

See also:

CSV (noun)

Description: CSV is an acronym for "comma-separated values," which is a set of values in which each value is separated by a comma. Spell out "comma-separated values" on first occurrence; use "CSV" thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: csv

Ctrl (noun)

Description: "Ctrl" refers to the Ctrl key on a keyboard.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: control key, ctrl

See also:

Cygmon (noun)

Description: "Cygmon" is a type of ROM monitor.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CygMon, cygmon, CYGMON

See also:

D

daisy chain (noun)

Description: When used as a noun, a "daisy chain" is a hardware configuration in which devices are connected to each other in series.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: daisy-chain, daisychain

See also: daisy chain (verb)

daisy chain (verb)

Description: When used as a verb "daisy chain" means to connect devices in a daisy-chain pattern, that is, in series.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: daisy-chain, daisychain

See also: daisy chain (noun)

data center (noun)

Description: A "data center" is a group of networked computer servers used for the remote storage, processing, or distribution of large amounts of data. Note that marketing publications use the one-word form, "datacenter."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: datacenter, data-center, data centre, datacentre

See also:

data mirroring (noun)

Description: "Data mirroring" is the act of copying data from one location to a storage device in real time.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: datamirroring, data-mirroring

See also:

data path (noun)

Description: A "data path" is a collection of functional units (such as arithmetic logic units or multipliers that perform data processing operations), registers, and buses. Along with the control unit, a "data path" comprises the central processing unit (CPU).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: datapath

See also:

debug (adjective)

Description: Use "debug" as an adjective to describe a type of command or script that is used to find and remove errors from a program or design, for example, a "debug script."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: de-bug

See also: debug (verb)

debug (verb)

Description: When used as a verb, "debug" means to find and remove errors from a program or design.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: de-bug

See also: debug (adjective)

denial of service (noun)

Description: "Denial of service" is an interruption in a user’s access to a computer network, usually caused deliberately and with malicious intent. Use "denial of service (DoS)" on first use and "DoS" thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Denial of Service

denial-of-service (adjective)

Description: When used as an adjective, spell as "denial-of-service," for example, "denial-of-service attack."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Denial-of-Service

desktop (adjective)

Description: Use "desktop" as an adjective when describing a type of computer, for example, "desktop computer."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: desk top, desk-top

See also: desktop (noun)

desktop (noun)

Description: When used as a noun, "desktop" can refer to a type of computer or the working area of a computer screen.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: desk top, desk-top

device (noun)

Description: A "device" is any machine or component that attaches to a computer.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

DevOps (noun)

Description: "DevOps" is a combination of "Development" and "Operations." It refers to a specific method or organizational approach where developers and IT operations staff work together to create the applications that run the business.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: devops, Devops, Dev-Ops, Dev Ops

See also:

different from (preposition)

Description: Use "different from" when comparing two things. Use "different from" when the next part of the sentence is a noun or pronoun.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: different than, different to

See also:

Disk Druid (noun)

Description: A "Disk Druid" is a partitioning tool incorporated into Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Disk druid, disk druid, diskdruid

See also:

disk label (noun)

Description: A "disk label" is a record that contains information about the location of the partitions on a disk.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: disklabel, disk-label

See also:

DNS (noun)

Description: "DNS" is an acronym for "Domain Name System" or "Domain Name Service," a service that translates domain names into IP addresses and vice versa.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: dns

See also:

domain name (noun)

Description: A "domain name" is a name that identifies one or more IP addresses, for example, "redhat.com."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: domainname, domain-name

See also:

download (noun)

Description: Use "download" as a noun when referring to software, data, and so on that is being retrieved from another computer.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: down-load, down load

See also: download (verb)

download (verb)

Description: Use "download" as a verb when referring to the act or process of downloading data.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: down-load, down load

See also: download (noun)

downstream (adjective)

Description: "Downstream" as an adjective refers to the Red Hat offerings that are based on upstream community projects.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: down-stream, down stream

downstream (noun)

Description: "Downstream" as a noun refers to the Red Hat offerings that are based on upstream community projects.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: down-stream, down stream

dual-boot (adjective)

Description: A "dual-boot" system is a system in which two operating systems are installed on the same hard drive.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: dualboot, dual boot

See also:

DVD writer (noun)

Description: A "DVD writer" is adevice that records data into the DVD format.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: DVD burner, burner

See also:

E

Emacs (noun)

Description: "Emacs" is a text editor available in Unix. Like vi, Emacs is a screen editor. Unlike vi, Emacs is not an insertion mode editor, meaning that any character typed in Emacs is automatically inserted into the file, unless it includes a command prefix.

If referring to the program, use "Emacs," for example, "Source-Navigator supports Emacs or vi commands." If referring to the shell prompt command, use emacs. The command should always be properly marked up, for example, "At the prompt, type emacs." The complete and correct name is "GNU Emacs."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

emit (verb)

Description: "Emit" means to send something out. Do not use "send out" because that is too informal and imprecise. Alternatively, use "issue."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: send out

See also:

Enter (noun)

Description: When referring to the keyboard key, use "Enter." If referring to the keyboard key on Solaris, use "Return."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: return

entitlement (noun)

Description: "Entitlement" refers to the number of systems that can be attached to an individual subscription. Using Red Hat Subscription Management (RHSM), you register a system, attach a subscription, and enable repositories. Attaching a subscription to the system consumes one or more of the subscription’s available entitlements. Do not use "entitlement" and "subscription" interchangeably. See https://access.redhat.com/discussions/3119981 for details.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

environment (noun)

Description: In IT, "environment" refers to the state of a computer, usually determined by which programs are running and basic hardware and software characteristics. For example, when one speaks of running a program in a Unix "environment," it means running a program on a computer that has the Unix operating system. One ingredient of an environment is the operating system, but operating systems include a number of different parameters. For example, many operating systems allow you to choose your command prompt or a default command path. All these parameters taken together comprise the environment.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

essentially (adverb)

Description: Do not use "essentially." It does not add anything to the sentence.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

event (noun)

Description: An "event" is an action or occurrence detected by a program. Events can be user actions, such as clicking a mouse button or pressing a key, or system occurrences, such as running out of memory.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

examine (verb)

Description: Use "examine" instead of "look at."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: look at

See also:

Exec-Shield (noun)

Description: "Exec-Shield" is a security-enhancing modification to the Linux kernel that makes large parts of specially marked programs including their stack not executable.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Exif (noun)

Description: "Exif" is an image file format specification that enables metadata tags to be added to existing JPEG, TIFF, and RIFF files. "Exif" is sometimes referred to as "Exif Print."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: EXIF, exif

See also:

extranet (noun)

Description: "Extranet" refers to an "intranet" that is partially accessible to authorized outsiders. Whereas an intranet resides behind a firewall and is accessible only to people who are members of the same company or organization, an extranet provides various levels of accessibility to outsiders. You can access an extranet only if you have a valid user name and password. Your identity determines which parts of the extranet you can view.

Capitalize "extranet" only at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Extranet

See also:

F

fail (verb)

Description: When a program "fails," it means that it stops working.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: terminate, crash

FAQ (noun)

Description: When referring to a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section of content, refer to it as "an FAQ" (to be read as "an F-A-Q"), not "a FAQ." The plural form is "FAQs."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Faq, faq, F.A.Q

See also:

fault tolerance (noun)

Description: "Fault tolerance" is the ability of a system to respond gracefully to an unexpected hardware or software failure. There are many levels of fault tolerance, the lowest being the ability to continue operation in the event of a power failure.

Use the two-word "fault tolerance" when using it as a noun.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: fault-tolerance

See also: fault-tolerant

fault-tolerant (adjective)

Description: "Fault-tolerant" systems can respond gracefully to an unexpected hardware or software failure. Many fault-tolerant computer systems mirror all operations, that is, every operation is performed on two or more duplicate systems, so if one fails the other can take over.

Use the hyphenated "fault-tolerant" when using it as an adjective.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: fault tolerant

See also: fault tolerance

Fedora™ Project (noun)

Description: The "Fedora Project" is a global partnership of free software community members, sponsored by Red Hat. Red Hat Enterprise Linux is based on the Fedora operating system.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: fedora project

See also:

FireWire (noun)

Description: "FireWire" is Apple’s name for the IEEE 1394 High Speed Serial Bus, a serial bus architecture for high-speed data transfer.

Do not use "Firewire" or "firewire." Although FireWire is a trademark of Apple Computer, it does not need to be listed with a trademark symbol when mentioned. Only use the trademark symbol when talking about Apple’s FireWire software license or specific logos. See http://developer.apple.com/softwarelicensing/agreements/firewire.html for full details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Firewire, firewire

See also:

firmware (noun)

Description: "Firmware" is software (programs or data) that has been written onto read-only memory (ROM). Firmware is a combination of software and hardware. ROMs, PROMs (programmable ROMs), and EPROMs (erasable PROMs) that have data or programs recorded on them are firmware.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: firm ware, firm-ware

See also:

floating point (noun)

Description: "Floating point" derives from the fact that there is no fixed number of digits before and after the decimal point, that is, the decimal point can float.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: floating-point

See also:

foreground (noun)

Description: In multiprocessing systems, "foreground" sometimes refers to the process that is currently accepting input from the keyboard or other input device. On display screens, the foreground consists of the characters and pictures that are displayed on the screen. The background is the uniform canvas behind the characters and pictures.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: fore-ground, forground

See also:

Fortran (noun)

Description: "Fortran" is a general-purpose, imperative programming language that is especially suited to numeric computation and scientific computing. For earlier versions up to FORTRAN 77, use "FORTRAN." For later versions beginning with Fortran 90, use "Fortran."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: fortran

See also:

FQDN (noun)

Description: "FQND" is an acronym for fully qualified domain name. A FQDN consists of a host and domain name, including top-level domain. For example, www.redhat.com is a fully qualified domain name. www is the host, redhat is the second-level domain, and .com is the top-level domain. A FQDN always starts with a host name and continues all the way up to the top-level domain name, so www.parc.xerox.com is also a FQDN.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Fqdn, fqdn

See also:

front-end (adjective)

Description: When used as adjective, "front-end" means something that is directly accessed by the user and allows access to further devices, programs, or databases. Do not use "frontend" as noun or adjective.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: frontend

See also: front end

front end (noun)

Description: When used as a noun, "front end" refers to the presentation layer. Do not use "frontend" as noun or adjective.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: frontend

See also: front-end

futex (noun)

Description: A "futex" (an abbreviation for "fast userspace mutex") is a Linux kernel system call that programmers can use to implement basic locking or as a building block for higher-level locking abstractions.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: futexes, mutex

futexes (noun)

Description: "Futex" is an abbreviation of "fast user-space mutex." "Futexes" is the correct plural form.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: futex, mutexes

fuzzy (adjective)

Description: It is only correct to use "fuzzy" as adjective when referring to "fuzzy searches" (the technique of finding strings that match a pattern approximately, rather than exactly). See Avoiding Slang, Metaphors, and Misleading Language for details and examples.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

G

G++ (noun)

Description: "G" is a C compiler usually operated using the command line. When referring to the program, use "G++."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: g++

g++ (noun)

Description: "G" is a C compiler usually operated through the command line. When referring to the command, use "g++," marked up appropriately.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: G++

GAS (noun)

Description: "GAS" is an acronym for "GNU Assembler," the assembler used by the GNU Project. When referring to the program, use "GAS."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: gas

gas (noun)

Description: "GAS" is an acronym for "GNU Assembler," the assembler used by the GNU Project. When referring to the command, use gas, marked up appropriately.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: GAS

GB (noun)

Description: "GB" is an acronym for gigabyte. Use a space between the value and the abbreviation, for example, "a 2 GB file."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: gb, Gb

See also: gigabyte

Gbps (noun)

Description: "Gbps" is an acronym for Gigabits per second, a data transfer speed measurement for high-speed networks such as Gigabit Ethernet. When used to describe data transfer rates, a gigabit equals 1,000,000,000 bits.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: gbps, GBPS

See also:

GCC (noun)

Description: "GCC" is an acronym for the "GNU Compiler Collection." GCC is a compiler system produced by the GNU Project supporting various programming languages. When referring to the program, use "GCC."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: gcc

gcc (noun)

Description: "GCC" is an acronym for the "GNU Compiler Collection." GCC is a compiler system produced by the GNU Project supporting various programming languages. When referring to the command, use gcc, marked up appropriately.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: GCC

GCJ (noun)

Description: "GCJ" is an acronym for the "GNU Compiler for Java." GCJ was a free compiler for the Java programming language and part of the GNU Compiler Collection. As of 2015, there were no new developments announced from GCJ. In 2016, GCJ was removed from GCC. When referring to the program, use "GCJ."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: gcj, GCC

gcj (noun)

Description: "GCJ" is an acronym for the "GNU Compiler for Java." GCJ was a free compiler for the Java programming language and part of the GNU Compiler Collection. As of 2015, there were no new developments announced from GCJ. In 2016, GCJ was removed from GCC. When referring to the command, use gcj, marked up appropriately.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: GCJ, gcc

GDB (noun)

Description: "GDB" is an acronym for "GNU Debugger," the standard debugger for the GNU operating system. It is a portable debugger that runs on many Unix-like systems and works for many programming languages. When referring to the program, use "GDB."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: gdb, Insight

gdb (noun)

Description: "GDB" is an acronym for "GNU Debugger," the standard debugger for the GNU operating system. It is a portable debugger that runs on many Unix-like systems and works for many programming languages. When referring to the command, use gdb, marked up appropriately.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: GDB, Insight

GID (noun)

Description: "GID" is an acronym for "Group ID." Do not use "gid."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: gid, Gid

See also:

gigabyte (noun)

Description: A "gigabyte" is 2 to the 30th power (1,073,741,824) bytes. One gigabyte is equal to 1,024 megabytes. When abbreviating gigabyte, use "GB."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: GB

GIMP (noun)

Description: "GIMP" is an acronym for "GNU Image Manipulation Program." Do not use "Gimp" or "gimp."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Gimp, gimp

See also:

GNOME (noun)

Description: "GNOME" is an open source desktop environment for Unix systems.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Gnome, gnome

See also: GNOME Classic

GNOME Classic (noun)

Description: Although the desktop team tends to refer to "GNOME Classic" (technically, GNOME Shell with the classic mode extensions enabled) as "classic mode" in internal and developer-oriented community documents, we should stay consistent with what is exposed to the user on the GNOME Display Manager (GDM) login screen, that is, "GNOME Classic." The GNOME "modern mode" (technically, GNOME Shell with the classic mode extensions disabled) is referred to as "GNOME" (on the login screen and elsewhere).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: classic mode

See also: GNOME

GNU (noun)

Description: "GNU" is a recursive acronym for "GNU’s Not Unix." GNU is a Unix-like, open-source operating system. Do not use "Gnu" or "gnu."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Gnu, gnu

See also:

GNUPro (noun)

Description: "GNUPro" Toolkit for Linux is designed for developing commercial and noncommercial Linux applications on native Linux platforms. It is a set of tested and certified, open-source, GNU standard C, C++, and assembly language development tools. When referring to the Red Hat product, use "GNUPro."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

GPL (noun)

Description: "GPL" is an acronym for "General Public License." Do not use "Gpl" or "gpl."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Gpl, gpl

See also:

grayscale (noun)

Description: "Grayscale" is a range of gray shades from white to black, as used in a monochrome display or printout. Do not use "gray-scale" or "gray scale." Only the noun form is currently recognized.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: gray-scale, gray scale

See also:

GRUB (noun)

Description: "GRUB" is an acronym for "GRand Unified Bootloader," which is a Linux boot loader.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Grub

See also:

GTK+ (noun)

Description: "GTK+" is an acronym for "GIMP Tool Kit." Do not use "GTK," "Gtk," or "gtk."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: GTK, Gtk, gtk

See also:

Guestfish (noun)

Description: "Guestfish" is an interactive shell that supports commands for accessing and modifying virtual disk images used in platform virtualization. You can use Guestfish for viewing and editing virtual machines (VMs) managed by libvirt.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: libvirt

guest operating system (noun)

Description: A "guest operating system" refers to the operating system that is installed in a virtual machine. Do not use "guest" by itself, because it is ambiguous.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

H

hard code (verb)

Description: "Hard code" means to configure values in source code such that it cannot be altered without modifying the code.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hardcode

See also:

hard-coded (adjective)

Description: A "hard-coded" value is a value that is configured in the source code such that it cannot be altered without modifying the code.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hardcoded

See also:

he (pronoun)

Description: Reword the sentence to avoid using "he" or "she."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: she

healthcare (noun)

Description: "Healthcare" refers to maintaining or improving health by preventing or treating health issues.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: health-care

See also:

health check (noun)

Description: A "health check" identifies inefficiencies in your IT systems, applications, and maintenance. "Health check" is only capitalized when it is part of a product name, for example, "Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Health Check." Do not capitalize "health check" when referring to those services in a general way, for example, "A health check ensures your systems perform at their best."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: healthcheck, health-check

See also:

help desk (noun)

Description: A "help desk" is a service that provides support for computer users.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: helpdesk, help-desk

See also:

hertz (noun)

Description: A "hertz" is a unit of frequency. Capitalize the initial "H" only at the beginning of a sentence. The correct abbreviation is "Hz."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

high-availability (adjective)

Description: Use "high-availability" to describe an object that is continuously available, for example, "high-availability cluster."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: high availability

high availability (noun)

Description: "High availability" is the concept of making a system or service continuously available, even if a particular component experiences a failure. An example is, "Support is available 24x7 to help maintain high availability."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: high-availability

high-performance computing (noun)

Description: "High-performance computing" is the use of parallel processing to obtain much more efficient processing of complex programs. Use standard hyphenation guidelines to maintain clarity.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

host group (noun)

Description: A "host group" is a group of one or more hosts. Only capitalize the initial "H" at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hostgroup

See also:

host name (noun)

Description: "Host name" is preferred spelling; do not use "hostname." Only capitalize the initial "H" at the beginning of a sentence. See The IBM Style Guide for more information.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hostname

See also:

hot add (verb)

Description: "Hot add" is the ability to add physical or virtual hardware to a running system without the need for downtime.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hotadd, hot-add

See also: hot plug, hot swap

hotline (noun)

Description: A "hotline" is a direct communications link between two points in which communications are automatically directed to a specific destination without the need for additional routing.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hot-line

See also:

hot plug (verb)

Description: "Hot plug" is the ability to add or remove physical or virtual hardware to or from a running system without the need for downtime.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hotplug, hot-plug

See also: hot add, hot swap

hot swap (verb)

Description: "Hot swap" is the ability to remove and replace physical or virtual hardware on a running system without the need for downtime.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hotswap, hot-swap

See also: hot add, hot plug

HP ProLiant (noun)

Description: "HP ProLiant" is a Hewlett-Packard (HP) server. Do not use any other variations.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: HP Proliant

See also:

HTML (noun)

Description: "HTML" is an acronym for "HyperText Markup Language," a markup language for web pages. When referring to the language, use "HTML," such as "To see the HTML version of this documentation." When referring to a web page extension, use "html," such as "The main page is index.html."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

huge-page (adjective)

Description: Use "huge-page" when referring to page sizes on Linux-based systems larger than the default size of 4096 bytes. Normal hyphenation rules apply. See huge page for capitalization rules.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: huge page (noun)

huge page (noun)

Description: Use "huge page" when referring to page sizes on Linux-based systems larger than the default size of 4096 bytes. Use the two-word version in uppercase and lowercase. Capitalize "huge" at the beginning of a sentence, and capitalize both words in titles. If you are documenting a user interface, use the capitalization used in that interface.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: large page, super page

Hyper-Threading (noun)

Description: "Hyper-Threading" is Intel’s implementation of simultaneous multithreading. If you are not referring specifically to Intel’s implementation, use "simultaneous multithreading" or "SMT."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hyperthreading, hyper-threading

See also:

hyperconverged (adjective)

Description: A hyperconverged system combines compute, storage, networking, and management capabilities into a single solution, simplifying deployment and reducing the cost of acquisition and maintenance.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hyper-converged

See also:

hypervisor (noun)

Description: A "hypervisor" is software that runs virtual machines. Only capitalize the initial "H" at the beginning of a sentence or as part of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: HyperVisor, Hyperviser

See also:

I

IaaS (noun)

Description: "Iaas" is an acronym for "Infrastructure-as-a-Service." Always use hyphens when spelling out the acronym.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: PaaS, SaaS

IBM eServer System p (noun)

Description: Use "IBM eServer System p" for the first reference, and "IBM System p" or "System p" for subsequent references.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: pSeries

See also:

IBM S/390 (noun)

Description: The "IBM S/390" is IBM’s large server (or mainframe) line of computer systems. Use the full description "IBM S/390."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: S/390, S90

See also:

IBM Z (noun)

Description: "IBM Z" is the new name for the "IBM z Systems" family of IBM mainframe computers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: IBM z Systems

See also:

InfiniBand (noun)

Description: "InfiniBand" is a switched fabric network topology used in high-performance computing. The term is both a service mark and a trademark of the InfiniBand Trade Association. Their rules for using the mark are standard ones: append the ™ symbol the first time it is used, and respect the capitalization (including the inter-capped "B") from then on. In ASCII-only circumstances, the "(TM)" string is the acceptable alternative.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Open InfiniBand, Infiniband

See also:

insecure (adjective)

Description: "Insecure" refers to something that is unsafe.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: nonsecure, non-secure

See also:

installation program (noun)

Description: An "installation program" is a program that installs certain software.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: the installer

See also:

Intel® Core™ (noun)

Description: "Intel® Core™" refers to a line of Intel brand processors.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Intel® EP80579 Integrated Processor (noun)

Description: "Intel® EP80579 Integrated Processor" is the official brand name.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Tolapai, Intel Tolapai

See also:

Intel Virtualization Technology (noun)

Description: The first and all prominent uses of "Intel Virtualization Technology" should be spelled out, immediately followed by the acronym, for example, "Intel Virtualization Technology (Intel VT) for Intel 64 or Itanium architecture (Intel VT-i)." Subsequent uses can be abbreviated to "Intel VT-i." Always write the acronym in uppercase letters, accompanied by the Intel mark. Do not use the acronym in any prominent places, such as in titles or paragraph headings. Do not include any trademark symbols, such as ™ or "(TM).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: VT-i, VT

See also:

Intel® Xeon® (noun)

Description: "Intel® Xeon®" refers to a line of Intel brand processors.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

interesting (adjective)

Description: Avoid using "interesting," as this term is a substitute for showing the reader why something is of interest. Instead of writing, "It is interesting to note…​," consider using a "Note" admonition.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Internet of Things (noun)

Description: The "Internet of Things" ("IoT") refers to uniquely identifiable objects and their virtual representations in an Internet-like structure. See the Internet of Things Wikipedia page for more information. Capitalize "Internet of Things" (IoT) as shown. Spell out "Internet of Things" on the first occurrence, and use the acronym thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

I/O (noun)

Description: "I/O" is an acronym for "input/output" (pronounced "eye-oh"). The term I/O is used to describe any program, operation, or device that transfers data to or from a computer and to or from a peripheral device. Every transfer is an output from one device and an input into another. Devices such as keyboards and mice are input-only devices, while devices such as printers are output-only. A writable CD is both an input and an output device.

The term I/O is a non-countable noun, meaning that it cannot be expressed in plural form. Append "operations" to refer to multiple units of I/O, for example, "I/O operations could not be recovered in situations where I/O should have been temporarily queued, such as when paths were unavailable."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: IO

See also:

IOPS (noun)

Description: "IOPS" is an acronym for "input/output operations per second."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Iops, IOPs

See also:

Insight (noun)

Description: "Insight" is a graphical user interface to the GNU Debugger (GDB). Insight is written in Tcl/Tk and was developed by associates from Red Hat and Cygnus Solutions.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: GDBTK

See also: GBD, gdb

IP (noun)

Description: "IP" is an acronym for "Internet Protocol."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ip

See also:

IP Masquerade (noun)

Description: "IP Masquerade" is a Linux networking function. IP Masquerade, also called "IPMASQ" or "MASQ," allows one or more computers in a network without assigned IP addresses to communicate with the Internet using the Linux server’s assigned IP address. The IPMASQ server acts as a gateway, and the other devices are invisible behind it. To other machines on the Internet, the outgoing traffic appears to be coming from the IPMASQ server and not the internal PCs. Because IPMASQ is a generic technology, the server can be connected to other computers through LAN technologies such as Ethernet, Token Ring, and FDDI, as well as dial-up connections such as PPP or SLIP.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

IPsec (noun)

Description: "IPsec" is an acronym for "Internet Protocol security."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: IPSec

See also:

IP switching (noun)

Description: "IP switching" is a type of IP routing developed by Ipsilon Networks, Inc. Unlike conventional routers, IP switching routers use ATM hardware to speed packets through networks. Although the technology is new, it appears to be considerably faster than older router techniques.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

ISO (noun)

Description: "ISO" is an acronym for the "International Organization for Standardization," which is an international standard-setting body made up of representatives from multiple national standards organizations. Since its founding in February 1947, ISO has promoted worldwide proprietary, industrial, and commercial standards.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: iso

See also:

ISO image (noun)

Description: An "ISO image" is a type of disk image comprising the data contents from every written sector on a media disk. ISO image files use the .iso file extension. According to Wikipedia, the ISO name comes from the ISO 9660 file system used with CD-ROM media, but what is known as an ISO image might also contain a UDF (ISO/IEC 13346) file system, which is often used by DVDs and Blu-ray discs.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: iso image

See also:

ISV (noun)

Description: "ISV" is an acronym for "independent software vendor," a company that produces software.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

IT, I.T. (noun)

Description: "IT" and "I.T." are acronyms for "information technology." Use "I.T." (with periods) only in headlines or subheadings where all uppercase letters are used to clarify that the word is "IT" rather than "it."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Itanium (noun)

Description: "Itanium" is a 64-bit RISC microprocessor and a member of Intel’s Merced family of processors. Based on the Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing (EPIC) design philosophy, which states that the compiler should decide which instructions be executed together, Itanium has the highest FPU power available. In 64-bit mode, Itanium is able to calculate two bundles of a maximum of three instructions at a time. In 32-bit mode, it is much slower. Decoders must first translate 32-bit instruction sets into 64-bit instruction sets, which results in extra-clock cycle use. Itanium’s primary use is driving large applications that require more than 4 GB of memory, such as databases, ERP, and future Internet applications.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: IA64, ia64

See also:

Itanium 2 (noun)

Description: "Itanium 2" is correct. Do not use "Itanium2" without the space between "Itanium" and "2."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Itanium2

See also:

ISeries (noun)

Description: Use "IBM eServer System i" for the first reference, and "IBM System i" or "System i" for subsequent references.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: iSeries

See also:

J

JavaScript (noun)

Description: "JavaScript" is a trademark of Oracle Corporation and should be used when referring to the scripting language. When referring to a file written using this language, use "javascript."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: javascript

javascript (adjective)

Description: When referring to a file written using the "JavaScript" language, use all lowercase letters, for example, "Copy the IPA javascript file to the /temp/ directory."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: JavaScript

JBoss Community (noun)

Description: Use "JBoss Community" when referring to the community of users and contributors. Do not refer to the community as "JBoss.org."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: JBoss.org

See also:

JBoss Way (noun)

Description: Capitalize "JBoss Way" as a formal, branded concept when referring specifically to the JBoss cultural and business climate or practices. If the reference is generic or the way is further specified, do not capitalize "way."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Red Hat Way, open source way

job (noun)

Description: A "job" is a task performed by a computer system, for example, printing a file is a job. Jobs can be performed by a single program or by a collection of programs.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

jsvc (noun)

Description: The Apache Commons Daemon "jsvc" is a set of libraries and applications for making Java applications run on Unix more easily. Capitalize the initial "J" only at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

just (adverb)

Description: Use "just" sparingly. In the phrase "Just open the file," "just" can be omitted.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

JVM (noun)

Description: "JVM" is an acronym for "Java Virtual Machine" and a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation. Due to this registration, use the full phrase "Java Virtual Machine" or "Java VM," or only the noun itself, "virtual machine." You can include JVM for clarity because most people know it as such, for example, "Java Virtual Machine (JVM)."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Jvm, jvm

See also:

K

KB (noun)

Description: "KB" is acromyn for "kilobyte." One KB equals 1024 bytes.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: kB

kB (noun)

Description: "kB" is an acronym for "kilobyte." One kB equals 1000 bytes.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: KB

kerberize (verb)

Description: Do not use "kerberize" or other variants to refer to applications or services that use Kerberos authentication. Refer to such applications as "Kerberos-aware" or "Kerberos-enabled," or rewrite the sentence.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: kerberized

kerberized (adjective)

Description: Do not use "kerberized" or other variants to refer to applications or services that use Kerberos authentication. Refer to such applications as "Kerberos-aware" or "Kerberos-enabled," or rewrite the sentence.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: kerberize

kernel (noun)

Description: The "kernel" is the central module of an operating system. It is the part of the operating system that loads first, and it remains in main memory. Because it stays in memory, it is important for the kernel to be as small as possible while still providing all the essential services required by other parts of the operating system and applications. Typically, the kernel is responsible for memory management, process and task management, and disk management.

Do not capitalize the first letter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Kernel

Kernel-based Virtual Machine (noun)

Description: "Kernel-based Virtual Machine" is a loadable kernel module that converts the Linux kernel into a bare-metal hypervisor. Spell out "Kernel-based Virtual Machine" on first occurrence, and use "KVM" thereafter. It is an industry standard and a proper noun.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kernel-based virtual machine

See also: KVM

kernel oops (noun)

Description: A "kernel oops" is an error in the Linux kernel. Do not use "oops" by itself.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: oops

See also: kernel, kernel panic

kernel panic (noun)

Description: Numerous circumstances can cause a "kernel panic." Unlike a "kernel oops," when confronted with a kernel panic, the operating system shuts down to prevent the possibility of further damage or security breaches.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: kernel, kernel oops

kernel space (noun)

Description: "Kernel space" is the part of the system memory where the kernel executes and provides its services.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kernelspace

See also: kernel, kernel-space

kernel-space (adjective)

Description: "Kernel space" is that part of the system memory where the kernel executes and provides its services. When used as modifier, use the hyphenated form "kernel-space."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kernelspace

See also: kernel, kernel space

Kickstart (noun)

Description: "Kickstart" is a tool for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora-based distributions that allows you to control various aspects of a system install process using commands in a text file. You can use Kickstart to change defaults or even do a fully automatic installation. Capitalize the first letter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kickstart

See also:

kill (verb)

Description: If terminating a Unix process, use "kill," for example, "To terminate the process, type kill -9 <PID>."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

knowledge base (noun)

Description: Use the two-word "knowledge base" unless referring specifically to the "Red Hat Knowledgebase."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: knowledgebase

See also: Knowledgebase

Knowledgebase (noun)

Description: Red Hat Knowledgebase includes solutions and articles written mainly by GSS support engineers. The proper spelling is "Knowledgebase," not "KnowledgeBase."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: KnowledgeBase

See also: knowledge base

KVM (noun)

Description: "KVM" is an acronym for "Kernel-based Virtual Machine."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kvm

L

LAN (noun)

Description: "LAN" is an acronym for "local area network."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Lan, lan

See also:

latency (noun)

Description: (1) In general, "latency" is the period of time that one component in a system is waiting for another component, which is wasted time. In accessing data on a disk, latency is the time it takes to position the proper sector under the read/write head. (2) In networking, "latency" is the amount of time it takes a packet to travel from source to destination. Latency and bandwidth define the speed and capacity of a network.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: bandwidth

libvirt (noun)

Description: "libvirt" is an open source API, daemon, and management tool for managing platform virtualization. It can manage several types of virtualization technologies, including KVM and QEMU. libvirt APIs are used in the orchestration layer of hypervisors in the development of cloud-based environments.

Use it: yes

Class: noun

Incorrect forms: Libvirt

See also: KVM

license (noun)

Description: A "license" is an official document that gives someone permission to do or use something.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: license (verb)

license (verb)

Description: When used as a verb, "license" means to give someone permission to do something.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: license (noun)

Linux (noun)

Description: "Linux" is a Unix-like operating system. Do not use "LINUX" because it is not an acronym. Do not use "linux" unless you are referring to a command, such as "To start Linux, type linux." In that case, mark it properly.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: LINUX, linux

See also:

load (verb)

Description: (1) To "load" means to copy a program from a storage device into memory. Every program must be loaded into memory before it can be executed. Usually, the loading process is performed invisibly by a part of the operating system called the loader. (2) In programming, "load" means to copy data from main memory into a data register. (3) In networking, "load" refers to the amount of data (traffic) being carried by the network.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

load balancing (noun)

Description: "Load balancing" distributes processing and communications activity evenly across a computer network so that no single device is overwhelmed. Load balancing is especially important for networks, where it is difficult to predict the number of requests that will be issued to a server. Busy websites typically employ two or more web servers in a load-balancing scheme. If one server starts to get swamped, requests are forwarded to another server with more capacity. Load balancing can also refer to the communications channels themselves.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

logical topology (noun)

Description: Every LAN has a topology, or the way that the devices on a network are arranged and how they communicate with each other. The "logical topology" (or "signal topology") is the way that the signals act on the network media, or the way that the data passes through the network from one device to the next without regard to the physical interconnection of the devices.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

lookup (noun)

Description: A "lookup" means an act of searching. The correct noun form is "lookup."

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: look up, look-up

look up (verb)

Description: To "look up" means to search for something. The correct verb form is "look up."

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: lookup, look-up

look-up (adjective)

Description: Hyphenate "look-up" when using it as a modifier.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: look up, lookup

loopback address (noun)

Description: The "loopback address" is a special IP address (127.0.0.1 for IPv4, ::1 for IPv6) that is designated for the software loopback interface of a machine. The loopback interface has no hardware associated with it, and it is not physically connected to a network. The loopback interface allows IT professionals to test IP software without worrying about broken or corrupted drivers or hardware.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

LPAR (noun)

Description: "LPAR" is an acronym for "logical partitioning," a system of taking a computer’s total resources (processors, memory, and storage) and splitting them into smaller units that each can be run with its own instance of the operating system and applications. Logical partitioning, which requires specialized hardware circuits, is typically used to separate different functions of a system, such as web serving, database functions, client/server actions, or systems that serve multiple time zones and/or languages. Logical partitioning can also be used to keep testing environments separated from the production environments. Because the logical partitions act as separate physical machines, they can communicate with each other. Logical partitioning was first used in 1976 by IBM.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

M

manual page (noun)

Description: A "manual page" is a form of software documentation tied directly with packages providing that software. It is accessible by using the man <utility> command from the command-line interface.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: man page

man page (noun)

Description: "Man page" is an abbreviation for "manual page."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: manpage

See also: manual page

many (noun)

Description: Use "many" to indicate the number of objects.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: lots of, bunches of

See also:

Master Boot Record (noun)

Description: "Master Boot Record" (MBR) is a small program that is executed when a computer boots up. Typically, the MBR resides on the first sector of the hard disk. The program begins the boot process by looking up the partition table to determine which partition to use for booting. It then transfers program control to the boot sector of that partition, which continues the boot process.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: MBR

matrixes (noun)

Description: In mathematics, a "matrix" is a rectangular array of numbers, symbols, or expressions arranged in rows and columns. The correct plural form for US English spelling is "matrixes."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: matrices

See also:

MB (noun)

Description: "MB" is an acronym for "megabyte," which is 1,000,000 bytes or 1,048,576 bytes, depending on the context.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Mb

Mb (noun)

Description: "Mb" is an acronym for "megabit." One megabit equals 1000 kilobits or 1,000,000 bits.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: MB

MBps (noun)

Description: "MBps" is an acronym for "megabytes per second," a measure of data transfer speed. Mass storage devices are generally measured in MBps.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

MBR (noun)

Description: "MBR" is an acronym for "Master Boot Record."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Master Boot Record

media (noun)

Description: (1) "Media" are objects on which data can be stored. These objects include hard disks, diskettes, CDs, and tapes. (2) In computer networks, "media" refer to the cables linking workstations together. There are many different types of transmission media, the most popular being twisted-pair wire (normal electrical wire), coaxial cable (the type of cable used for cable television), and fiber optic cable (cables made out of glass). (3) "Media" can also mean the form and technology used to communicate information. Multimedia presentations, for example, combine sound, pictures, and videos, all of which are different types of media.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Description: Use "menu-driven" to refer to programs whose user interface employs menus rather than command-line interface commands.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: menu driven, menudriven

See also: command-driven

micro release (noun)

Description: "Micro release" refers to the z in an x.y.z product version numbering schema. Use only if required for generic reference to a release and the term is in use already by the product. In all other instances refer to the specific release number.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: z-stream

Microsoft (noun)

Description: "Microsoft" is a technology company that develops, manufactures, licenses, supports, and sells computer software, consumer electronics, personal computers, and services.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: MS, MSFT, MicroSoft

See also: MS-DOS

misconfigure (verb)

Description: "Misconfigure" means to configure something incorrectly. Avoid using it if possible.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: mis-configure

See also:

mount (verb)

Description: (1) "Mount" means to make a mass storage device available. In Linux environments, for example, inserting a floppy disk into the drive is called "mounting" the floppy. (2) "Mount" also means to install a device, such as a disk drive or expansion board.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: unmount

mouse button (noun)

Description: Use "mouse button" as two words. If you need to indicate which mouse button to use, use "right," "left," or "center," such as "right mouse button."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: mouse-button, mousebutton

See also:

Mozilla Firefox (noun)

Description: "Mozilla Firefox" is an open source web browser. The first reference must be "Mozilla Firefox." Subsequent references can be "Firefox." Do not use "firefox" unless you are referring to the firefox command; as such, mark it properly.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: firefox

Mozilla Thunderbird (noun)

Description: "Mozilla Thunderbird" is a free, open source, cross-platform email, news, RSS, and chat client. The first reference must be "Mozilla Thunderbird." Subsequent references can be "Thunderbird." Do not use "thunderbird" unless you are referring to the thunderbird command; as such, mark it properly.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: thunderbird

See also: Mozilla Firefox

MS-DOS (noun)

Description: "MS-DOS" is an operating system, mostly developed by Microsoft.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: ms-dos, MSDOS, msdos

See also: Microsoft

multiprocessing (noun)

Description: "Multiprocessing" is the use of two or more central processing units within a single computer system.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: multi-processing

See also:

multitenant (adjective)

Description: "Multitenant" describes a mode where a software instance serves multiple tenants. Do not hyphenate "multitenant".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: multi-tenant

See also:

mutual exclusion (noun)

Description: In computer science, "mutual exclusion" is a property of concurrency control, which is instituted for the purpose of preventing race conditions. It is the requirement that one thread of execution never enter its critical section at the same time that another concurrent thread of execution enters its own critical section.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Mutex, Mutexes

mutex (noun)

Description: "Mutex" is an abbreviation for "mutual exclusion."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

mutexes (noun)

Description: "Mutexes" is the plural form of "mutex."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: mutual exclusion, Mutex

MySQL (noun)

Description: "MySQL" is the common open source database server and client package from Microsoft. Mark the first mention of MySQL in body text with an r-ball (®) to denote that it is a registered trademark.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: MYSQL, mySQL

See also: SQL

N

need (verb)

Description: Use "need" instead of "desire" or "wish." Use "want" when the reader’s actions are optional (that is, one might not need something but might still want something).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: desire, wish

See also: want

neighbor (noun)

Description: "Neighbor" is the accepted spelling.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: neighbour

See also:

network transparency (noun)

Description: "Network transparency" is a condition where an operating system or other service allows the user access to a remote resource through a network without needing to know if the resource is remote or local. For example, Sun Microsystems' NFS, which has become a de facto industry standard, provides access to shared files through an interface called the Virtual File System (VFS) that runs on top of the TCP/IP stack. Users can manipulate shared files as if they were stored locally on the user’s hard disk.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

NFS (noun)

Description: "NFS" is an acronym for "Network File System." NFS is a client-server application designed by Sun Microsystems that allows all network users to access shared files stored on computers of different types. NFS provides access to shared files through an interface called the Virtual File System (VFS) that runs in a layer above TCP/IP. Users can manipulate shared files as if they were stored locally on the user’s own hard disk. With NFS, computers connected to a network operate as clients while accessing remote files, and as servers while providing remote users access to local shared files. The NFS standards are publicly available and widely used.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

node (noun)

Description: 1) In networks, a "node" is a processing location. A node can be a computer or other device, such as a printer. Every node has a unique network address, sometimes called a Data Link Control (DLC) address or Media Access Control (MAC) address. In tree structures, a node is a point where two or more lines meet. 2) In the context of OpenShift, a "node" provides the runtime environments for containers. 3) In the context of OpenStack, use "node" to refer to a machine running a particular OpenStack service, for example, "a Networking node." Exceptions: In a virtualization use case where the machine resources are being used to host virtual machines, use "host" instead of "node," for example, "a Compute host." 4) In Fuse tooling, a node is a Camel component or EIP that has been dragged from the Palette and dropped on the route editor’s canvas displayed on the Design tab. Selecting a node on the canvas displays its properties in Properties view for editing. Selecting a node on the canvas also displays its usage details on the Documentation tab in Properties view.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

now (adverb)

Description: "Now" means at the present time, immediately, or at once.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: right now

See also:

NULL (noun)

Description: Use "NULL" when a command or value is stated.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: null

See also: null

null (adjective)

Description: Use "null" (in all lowercase letters) when stating that something is null.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: NULL

See also: NULL

numbers (adverb)

Description: Spell out the numbers zero through nine. Spell out any number that begins a sentence. Spell out a number that precedes another number (four 6-pound bags or eleven 20-pound bags). Spell out approximations (for example, thousands of …​) and very large values (for example, 4 billion). Use numerals for numbers 10 and greater, negative numbers, fractions, percentages, decimals, measurements, references to book sections (Chapter 3, Table 5, Page 11), and numbers less than 10 if they appear in the same paragraph as numbers of 10 or greater. (You answered 8 out of 14 questions correctly.) Use numerals when referring to registers (such as R1), code (such as x = 6), and release versions (Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Source-Navigator 4.5). Do not use commas in numbers with four digits (for example, 1000 rather than 1,000). Use commas in numbers with five or more digits (for example, 10,000). See The IBM Style Guide for detailed information on numbering formats.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

O

Objective C (noun)

Description: "Objective C" is the name of a programming language.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Objective-C

See also:

OEM (noun)

Description: "OEM" is an acronym for "original equipment manufacturer," which is a misleading term for a company that has a special relationship with computer producers. OEMs buy computers in bulk and customize them for a particular application. They then sell the customized computer under their own name. OEMs are not the original manufacturers; they are the customizers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

offline backup (noun)

Description: Use "offline backup" to refer to backing up a database while the database is not being accessed by applications.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: cold backup

See also: online backup

OK (noun)

Description: When referring to the "OK" button, it is not necessary to use "button" in the sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: OK button

See also:

omit (verb)

Description: Use "omit" rather than "leave out" and other terms meaning the same thing.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: leave out

See also:

on-board (adjective)

Description: Hyphenate "on-board" when using it as an adjective. The term "on board" is also valid, for example, "They are on board with the idea." Try to reword the sentence to avoid using "on board."

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: onboard

onboard (verb)

Description: "Onboard" is usually used to describe the process of introducing a new employee to the company.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: on-board

online backup (noun)

Description: From webopedia: In storage technology, "online backup" means to back up data from your hard drive to a remote server or computer using a network connection.

Use it:

Incorrect forms:

See also: offline backup

on-premise (adjective)

Description: Substitute "on-site" or "in-house" for "on-premise" whenever possible. Although "on-premises" is grammatically correct, "on-premise" is preferred by the industry and the Red Hat Cloud business unit. Capitalize "on-premise" only when using it as part of the name of the Red Hat product "Red Hat Storage Server for On-premise."

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: on premise

See also:

on-the-fly

Description: "On-the-fly" is an idiom meaning "as you go" or "in real time." Do not use it as it is not universally understood.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: real time

opcode (noun)

Description: An "opcode" is the portion of a machine language instruction that specifies the operation to be performed.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: op-code

See also:

open architecture (noun)

Description: An "open architecture" is an architecture whose specifications are public. This includes officially approved standards as well as privately designed architectures whose specifications are made public by the designers. The opposite of "open architecture" is "closed architecture" or "proprietary architecture."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

open source (noun)

Description: "Open source" means that the source code of a program or utility can be viewed, modified, and shared. See What is Open Source for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: open-source, OpenSource, opensource

See also:

OpEx (noun)

Description: "OpEx" is an abbreviation of "operating expenses."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Opex, Opex, OPEX, opEx

See also:

operating environment (noun)

Description: An "operating environment" is the environment in which a user can run application software. An operating environment consists of a user interface provided by an applications manager and usually includes an application programming interface (API).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Operating Environment

See also: control program

operating system (noun)

Description: From Wikipedia: An "operating system" is system software that manages computer hardware and software resources and provides common services for computer programs. All computer programs, excluding firmware, require an operating system to function.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: OS, Operating System

See also:

output device (noun)

Description: An "output device" is any machine capable of representing information from a computer, such as display screens, printers, plotters, and synthesizers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

override (verb)

Description: In computing, "override" means to force the use of a specific setting or value instead of the one that would otherwise be used, for example, "apply a setting from a configuration file to override the default ones."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: over-ride, over ride

See also:

P

PaaS (noun)

Description: "PaaS" is an acronym for "Platform-as-a-Service." In the spelled-out version of this term and its variants (for example, "Infrastructure-as-a-Service" and "Software-as-a-Service"), hyphens are always used. Note for Marketing, Brand, or Customer Portal usage: For all-uppercase text, such as banners, use "<VARIANT>-AS-A-SERVICE" for the spelled-out version. The same acronym is used across all groups.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: SaaS, IaaS

PC (noun)

Description: "PC" is an acronym for personal computer. See The IBM Style Guide for further information.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

performance counter (noun)

Description: A "performance counter" is a utility for collecting and analyzing performance data. Always use "performance counter" unless referring to a code element named perfcounter and as such, mark it up appropriately (perfcounter).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: perfcounter

See also:

PHP (noun)

Description: Use "PHP" when referring to the programming language in general. Use php when referring to the specific command or some other literal use. See http://www.php.net/ for specific PHP language information. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PHP for more general information.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Pico (noun)

Description: Capitalize "Pico" when referring to the text editor or to the programming language. Do not capitalize "pico" when referring to the SI prefix.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

physical topology (noun)

Description: Every LAN has a topology, or the way that the devices on a network are arranged and how they communicate with each other. The physical topology is the way that the workstations are connected to the network through the actual cables that transmit data.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

plain text (adjective)

Description: "Plain text" is correct in almost all cases. We use "plain text" as a plain English denotation of all unencrypted information, whether it is being stored or is being fed to an encryption algorithm. Unless it is necessary to make the cryptographer’s distinction, do not use "plaintext" or "cleartext." Cryptographers distinguish between "cleartext" (unencrypted data) and "plaintext" (unencrypted data as input to an encryption algorithm).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: plaintext, plain-text, cleartext, clear text

See also:

please (adverb)

Description: Instead of saying "Please refer to the Getting Started Guide," use "See the Getting Started Guide."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

pluggable (noun)

Description: "Pluggable" refers to something that is capable of being plugged in, especially in terms of (for example) software modules. "Hot-pluggable" is also widely used with respect to hardware to indicate that it can be connected and recognized without powering down the system.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

plug-in (noun)

Description: A "plug-in" is a hardware or software module that adds a specific feature or service to a larger system. For example, a number of plug-ins are available for the Netscape Navigator browser that enable it to display different types of audio or video messages. Navigator plug-ins are based on MIME file types.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Description: A "pop-up" is a graphical user interface (GUI) display area, usually a small window, that is suddenly displayed in the foreground of the visual interface. Pop-ups can be initiated by a single or double mouse click or rollover (sometimes called a mouseover). A pop-up window must be smaller than the background window or interface; otherwise, it’s a replacement interface.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: popup, Pop-up

See also:

PostScript (noun)

Description: "PostScript" is a registered trademark of Adobe.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Postscript

See also:

PowerPC (noun)

Description: Depending on context, "PowerPC" refers to either "64-bit PowerPC" (which covers most 64-bit PowerPC implementations) or "64-bit IBM POWER Series" (which covers the IBM POWER2 and IBM POWER8 series). The PowerPC version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux runs on 64-bit IBM POWER series hardware in almost all cases.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: PPC, P-PC, PPC64

See also:

POSIX (noun)

Description: "POSIX" is an acronym for "Portable Operating System Interface [for Unix]."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Posix, posix, variations

See also:

PPP (noun)

Description: "PPP" is an acronym for "Point-to-Point Protocol," a data link (layer 2) protocol used to establish a direct connection between two nodes. PPP can provide connection authentication, transmission encryption (using ECP, RFC 1968), and compression.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ppp, ppp

See also:

press (verb)

Description: Use "press" for keyboard instructions, for example, "Press Enter."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

PROM (noun)

Description: "PROM" is an acronym for "programmable read-only memory" and is a variation of "ROM." PROMs are manufactured as blank chips on which data can be written with a device called a PROM programmer.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: prom, Prom

See also: ROM

proof of concept (noun)

Description: Use the following rules to form the plural of this phrase: Use "proofs of concept" for multiple proofs but only one concept. Use "proofs of concepts" for multiple proofs and multiple concepts.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: proof of concepts

See also:

pseudo-ops (noun)

Description: "Pseudo-ops" is an abbreviation for "pseudo operations" and is sometimes called an assembler directive. These keywords do not directly translate to a machine instruction.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: pseudo ops, pseudoops

See also:

pSeries (noun)

Description: Use "IBM eServer System p" for the first reference; use "IBM System p" or "System p" for subsequent references.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

pulldown (adjective)

Description: A "pulldown" is the common type of menu used with a graphical user interface (GUI). Clicking a menu title causes the menu items to drop down from that position and be displayed. Options are selected either by clicking the menu item or by continuing to hold the mouse button down and letting go when the item is highlighted.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: pull-down

See also:

PXE (noun)

Description: "PXE" is an acronym for "Pre-Boot Execution Environment." Pronounced "pixie," PXE is one of the components of Intel’s Wired for Management (WfM) specification. It allows a workstation to boot from a server on a network in preference to booting the operating system on the local hard drive. PXE is a mandatory element of the WfM specification. To be considered compliant, PXE must be supported by the computer’s BIOS and its NIC.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Q

Q and A (noun)

Description: "Q and A" is an abbreviation for "Question and Answer," as defined by the American Heritage Dictionary. In DocBook XML, the title is defined by the DocBook style sheets for the <qandadiv> element. The relevant generated text in English is "Q & A" and is localized automatically.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: q & a, q&a Q & A, Q&A

See also:

QCOW2 (noun)

Description: "QCOW2" is an acronym for "QEMU Copy On Write version 2." QCOW2 is a file format for disk image files used by QEMU, a hosted virtual machine monitor. Always write this term in uppercase letters.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: qcow2, Qcow2

See also: KVM

qeth (adjective)

Description: Messages with a prefix "qeth" are issued by the qeth device driver. The qeth device driver supports a multitude of network connections, for example, connections through Open Systems Adapters (OSA), HiperSockets™, guest LANs, and virtual switches.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Qeth, QETH

See also:

quiescent (adjective)

Description: This lofty-sounding word means at rest, quiet, or inactive. With reference to a measurable property or system, it can also mean not active. A system can be quiescent, meaning it is inactive, or (by extension) in a known, unchanging state. If this is what you mean, this is what you should write. If a system is, or needs to be inactive, write inactive. If a system is, or needs to be safe, write safe.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

R

RAM (noun)

Description: "RAM" is an acronym for "random access memory."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ram, ram

See also: RAM disk

RAM disk (noun)

Description: "RAM disk" refers to "RAM" that has been configured to simulate a disk drive. You can access files on a RAM disk as you would access files on a physical disk. RAM disks, however, are approximately a thousand times faster than hard disk drives. They are particularly useful for applications that require frequent disk accesses.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RAMdisk, ramdisk, RAM-disk

See also: RAM

raw (adjective)

Description: In computing terms, "raw" means unprocessed. The term refers to data that is passed to an I/O device without being interpreted. In contrast, "cooked" refers to data that is processed before being passed to the I/O device. The term comes from Unix, which supports cooked and raw modes for data output to a terminal. In cooked mode, special characters, such as erase and kill, are processed by the device driver before being sent to the output device.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RAW

See also: cooked

raw data (noun)

Description: "Raw data" is information that has not been organized, formatted, or analyzed.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

read (verb)

Description: To "read" means to copy data to a place where it can be used by a program. Read is commonly used to describe copying data from a storage medium, such as a disk, to main memory. It is also used to refer to the act of determining the contents of a variable or parameter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: read (noun)

read (noun)

Description: When used as a noun, "read" refers to the act of reading, for example, "A fast disk drive performs 100 'reads' per second."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: read (verb)

real time (noun)

Description: As a noun, "real time" is the actual time during which something takes place, for example, "The computer may partly analyze the data in real time (as it comes in) — R. H. March."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: realtime

See also: real-time

real-time (adjective)

Description: As an adjective, use the hyphenated form, for example, "XEmacs is a self-documenting, customizable, extensible, real-time display editor."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: realtime

See also: real time

reboot (verb)

Description: "Reboot" means to turn off a computer’s operating system and then turn it on.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: re-boot

See also:

recommend (verb)

Description: Avoid "recommends". Instead of "Red Hat recommends", direct users to take the recommended action. This allows Red Hat to be more prescriptive in documentation and prevent any user uncertainty, and is easier for upstream/downstream coordinated efforts.

For example, instead of "Red Hat recommends using X package because", write "Use this package because" or "Use this package when".

Use it: no

Incorrect forms: we recommend, we suggest, Red Hat recommends

See also: we suggest

RedBoot (noun)

Description: "RedBoot" is an acronym for "Red Hat Embedded Debug and Bootstrap" firmware. RedBoot is a complete bootstrap environment for embedded systems. Based on the eCos Hardware Abstraction Layer, RedBoot inherits the eCos qualities of reliability, compactness, configurability, and portability.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Redboot, Red Boot, red

See also:

Red Hat Container Catalog (noun)

Description: "Red Hat Container Catalog" is Red Hat’s hosted registry for Enterprise-ready containers located at access.redhat.com/containers. Red Hat Container Catalog is a trusted source for secure, certified, and up-to-date container images. Write this name in full the first time that you use it in a document.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Description: "Red Hat Enterprise Linux" is an open source operating system based on Fedora and developed by Red Hat.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: RHEL

Red Hat Network Satellite Server (noun)

Description: Use "Red Hat Network Satellite Server" for the first occurrence; use "RHN Satellite Server" or omit the word "Server" from any of the previous constructions on subsequent mentions. With sufficient context, you can refer to "Satellite" and "Proxy," for example, "RHN Satellite and Proxy" instead of "RHN Satellite and RHN Proxy."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Red Hat Satellite (Server)

Red Hat Network Proxy Server (noun)

Description: Use "Red Hat Network Proxy Server" for the first occurrence; use "RHN Proxy Server" or omit the word "Server" from any of the previous constructions on subsequent mentions. With sufficient context, you can refer to "Satellite" and "Proxy," for example, "RHN Satellite and Proxy" instead of "RHN Satellite and RHN Proxy."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Red Hat Proxy (Server)

Red Hat Way (noun)

Description: "Red Hat Way" refers to the culture valued and maintained by Red Hat associates.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Red Hat way

See also:

relative path (noun)

Description: The path related to the present working directory. Because it does not provide enough information for a program to locate a file, it must be combined with an additional path to access a file.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

remote access (noun)

Description: "Remote access" is the ability to log on to a network from a distant location. Generally, this implies a computer, a modem, and some remote access software to connect to the network. "Remote control" refers to taking control of another computer, while "remote access" means that the remote computer actually becomes a full-fledged host on the network. The remote access software dials in directly to the network server. The only difference between a remote host and workstations connected directly to the network is slower data transfer speeds.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: remote-access

remote access server (noun)

Description: A "remote access server" is a server that is dedicated to handling users that are not on a LAN but need remote access to it. The remote access server allows users to gain access to files and print services on the LAN from a remote location. For example, a user who dials in to a network from home using an analog modem or an ISDN connection will dial in to a remote access server. Once authenticated, the user can access shared drives and printers as if they were physically connected to the office LAN.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: remote-access server

See also: remote access

repository (noun)

Description: Repositories provide the packages required for Red Hat products. Using Red Hat Subscription Management (RHSM), you register a system, attach a subscription, and enable repositories. Do not confuse this with Red Hat Network (RHN), where you subscribed to channels.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: channel

required (adjective)

Description: "Required" can mean needed, essential, or obligatory. Example 1: "The module is missing essential parts." Example 2: "Filling in the Class field is obligatory."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Resilient Storage Add-On (noun)

Description: "Resilient Storage Add-On" is an add-on to Red Hat Enterprise Linux that allows a shared storage or clustered file system to access the same storage device over a network. The Resilient Storage Add-On creates a pool of data that is available to each server in a group by creating consistent storage across a cluster of servers that is protected if any one server fails.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

return (verb)

Description: When referring to the keyboard key on Solaris or Mac, use "Return" or "return," respectively. See "enter" for other platforms.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: enter

RHEL (noun)

Description: "RHEL" is an acronym for "Red Hat Enterprise Linux." The conventions for using this acronym vary for different products and teams. If you are not sure whether to use the acronym or only the full version, ask your team members.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

roll out (verb)

Description: In marketing, to "roll out" a product means to introduce it in stages to the public. In computing, to roll out software means to install a new product across a network.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: rollout

See also: rollout

rollout (noun)

Description: In marketing, "rollout" describes a series of related product announcements. When a company installs new equipment or software, this process is also called a "rollout."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: roll out

See also: roll-out

ROM (noun)

Description: "ROM" is an acronym for "read-only memory," that is, computer memory on which data has been prerecorded. After data has been written onto a ROM chip, it cannot be removed and can only be read.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Rom, rom

See also: PROM

roundtable (noun)

Description: Use "roundtable" when referring to a type of event or gathering.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: round table

See also: round table

round table (noun)

Description: Use "round table" when referring to a circular table.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: roundtable

See also: roundtable

routine (noun)

Description: A "routine" is a set of programming instructions designed to perform a specific limited task.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

RPM (noun)

Description: "RPM" is the recursive initialism for the "RPM Package Manager." RPM manages files in the RPM format, known as RPM packages. RPM packages are known informally as rpm files, but this informal usage is not used in Red Hat documentation to avoid confusion with the command name. Files in RPM format are referred to as RPM packages.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: rpm

See also:

runlevel (noun)

Description: A "runlevel" is a preset operating state on a Unix-like operating system. A system can be booted in to (that is, started up in to) any of several runlevels, each of which is represented by a single-digit integer. Each runlevel designates a different system configuration and allows access to a different combination of processes (that is, instances of executing programs). There are differences in the runlevels according to the operating system. Seven runlevels are supported in the standard Linux kernel.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: run level, run-level

See also:

runtime (noun)

Description: "Runtime" is when a program is running (or being executed), that is, when you start a program running in a computer, it is the runtime for that program. In some programming languages, certain reusable programs or routines are built and packaged as a runtime library.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: run time, run-time

See also:

S

SaaS (noun)

Description: "Saas" is an acronym for Software-as-a-Service. In the spelled-out version and its variants (for example, Infrastructure-as-a-Service and Platform-as-a-Service), hyphens are always used. Note for Marketing, Brand, or Customer Portal usage: For all-uppercase text (such as banners), use "<VARIANT>-AS-A-SERVICE" for the spelled-out version. The same acronym is used across all groups.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: IaaS, PaaS

Samba (noun)

Description: "Samba" is a freeware program that allows end users to access and use files, printers, and other commonly shared resources on a company’s intranet or on the Internet. Samba can be installed on a variety of operating system platforms, including Linux, most common Unix platforms, OpenVMS, and OS/2.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: samba, SAMBA

See also:

S-record (noun)

Description: "Motorola S-record" is a file format that stores binary information in ASCII hex text form.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: s-record, S-Record, s-Record, SREC, or any other variation

See also:

screen saver (noun)

Description: A "screen saver" is an image or animation that replaces a computer’s display after a set amount of time without user activity.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: screensaver

See also:

scrollbar (noun)

Description: A "scrollbar" is a long, thin rectangle on the edge of the screen that allows a user to view information that does not fit on a single screen display.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: scroll bar, scroll-bar

See also:

see (verb)

Description: Use "see" to refer readers to another resource, for example, "See the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Installation Guide for more information." Avoid using "refer to" in this context.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: refer to

See also:

segmentation fault (noun)

Description: A "segmentation fault" occurs when a process tries to access a memory location that it is not allowed to access, or tries to access a memory location in a way that is not allowed (for example, if the process tries to write to a read-only location or to overwrite part of the operating system). Only use the abbreviation "segfault" if absolutely necessary, and never use it as a verb.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: segfault as a verb

See also: A Guide for Troubleshooting a Segfault on the Customer Portal for more information.

SELinux (noun)

Description: "SELinux" is an abbreviation for Security-Enhanced Linux. SELinux uses Linux Security Modules (LSM) in the Linux kernel to provide a range of minimum-privilege-required security policies. Do not use alternatives such as "SE-Linux," "S-E Linux," or "SE Linux."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: SE-Linux, S-E Linux, SE Linux, selinux

See also:

server cluster (noun)

Description: A "server cluster" is a group of networked servers housed in one location. This organization of servers streamlines internal processes by distributing the workload between the individual components of the group. It also expedites computing processes by harnessing the power of multiple servers. The clusters rely on load-balancing software that accomplishes tasks such as tracking demand for processing power from different machines, prioritizing the tasks, and scheduling and rescheduling them, depending on priority and demand on the network. When one server in the cluster fails, another server can serve as a backup.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: computer farm, computer ranch

See also: server farm

server farm (noun)

Description: A "server farm" is a group of networked servers housed in one location. This organization of servers streamlines internal processes by distributing the workload between the individual components of the group. It also expedites computing processes by harnessing the power of multiple servers. The farms rely on load-balancing software that accomplishes tasks such as tracking demand for processing power from different machines, prioritizing the tasks, and scheduling and rescheduling them, depending on priority and demand on the network. When one server in the farm fails, another server can serve as a backup.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: computer farm, computer ranch

See also: server cluster

server side (noun)

Description: The "server side" means that the action takes place on a web server in a client/server relationship. Use this form when "server side" is a noun, for example, "She does most of her programming on the server side, that is, directly on the web server."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: server-side

See also: server-side

server-side (adjective)

Description: Use "server-side" as an adjective when referring to operations performed by the server in a client/server relationship, for example, "Her specialty is server-side programming."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: server side

See also: server side

SHA-1 (noun)

Description: "SHA" is an acronym for Secure Hash Algorithm and is a cryptographic hash function. SHA-1 is an earlier hashing algorithm that is being replaced by SHA-2.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: SHA-2

SHA-2 (noun)

Description: "SHA" is an acronym for Secure Hash Algorithm and is a cryptographic hash function. The encryption hash used in SHA-2 is significantly stronger and not subject to the same vulnerabilities as SHA-1. SHA-2 variants are often specified using their digest size, in bits, as the trailing number, instead of 2. SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, and SHA-512 are all correct when referring to these specific hash functions.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: SHA-1

Shadowman (noun)

Description: "Shadowman" is Red Hat’s corporate logo and is a trademark of Red Hat, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Shadow Man, ShadowMan

shadow passwords (noun)

Description: "Shadow passwords" are a method of improving system security by moving the encrypted passwords (normally found in /etc/passwd) to /etc/shadow, which is readable only by root. This option is available during installation and is part of the shadow utilities package. Shadow passwords is not a proper noun and is only capitalized at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Shadow passwords (capitalized)

See also:

shadow utilities (noun)

Description: "Shadow utilities" are the specific system programs that operate on the shadow password files. Shadow utilities is not a proper noun and is only capitalized at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Shadow utilities (capitalized)

See also:

share name (noun)

Description: "Share name" is the name of a shared resource. Use it as two words unless you are quoting the output of commands, such as "smbclient -L."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: sharename, Sharename

See also:

she (pronoun)

Description: Reword the sentence to avoid using "he" or "she." Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: he

shell (noun)

Description: A "shell" is a software application (for example, /bin/bash or /bin/sh) that provides an interface to a computer. Do not use this term to describe the prompt where you type commands.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: shell prompt

shell prompt (noun)

Description: The "shell prompt" is the character at the beginning of the command line, for example "$" or "#". It indicates that the shell is ready to accept commands. Do not use "command prompt," "terminal," or "shell."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: command prompt, terminal, shell

See also: shell

signal topology (noun)

Description: Every LAN has a topology, or the way that the devices on a network are arranged and how they communicate with each other. The "signal topology" is the way that the signals act on the network media, or the way that the data passes through the network from one device to the next without regard to the physical interconnection of the devices. The signal topology is also called "logical topology."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

skill set (noun)

Description: Use "skills" or "knowledge" instead of "skill set" (n) or "skill-set" (adj). For example, "Do you have the right skill set to be an RHCE?" is incorrect. Use "Do you have the right skills to be an RHCE?" instead.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms: skill set, skillset, skill-set, skill-set knowledge

See also:

snippet (noun)

Description: A "snippet" is a small piece or brief extract. Use "piece" instead of snippet. Use "excerpt" to refer to samples taken from a more-extensive section of text.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

SOCKS (noun)

Description: "SOCKS" is an acronym for Socket Secure, which is an Internet protocol that exchanges network packets between a client and server through a proxy server. When specifying a SOCKS version, use "SOCKSv4" or "SOCKSv5."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: socks

See also:

softcopy (noun)

Description: "Softcopy" is an electronic copy of some type of data, for example, a file viewed on a computer screen. Use "online" instead of softcopy, for example, "To view the online documentation…​​."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Software Collection (noun)

Description: A "Software Collection" (SCL) allows for building and concurrent installation of multiple versions of the same software component on a single system. Always capitalize as shown. The abbreviation "SCL" (plural form "SCLs") is acceptable only for use in technical documents or documents shared with upstream projects.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: software collection, collection, Software collection, Collection

See also:

sound card (noun)

Description: A "sound card" is a device slotted into a computer to allow the use of audio components for multimedia applications.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: soundcard, sound-card

See also:

Source-NavigatorTM (noun)

Description: "Source-NavigatorTM" is a source code analysis tool and is a Red Hat trademark.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Source Navigator (without trademark symbol)

See also:

space (noun)

Description: Use "space" to refer to white space, for example, "Ensure there is a space between each command." Use "spacebar" when referring to the keyboard key.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: spacebar

spacebar (noun)

Description: Use "spacebar" when referring to the keyboard key, for example, "Press the spacebar and type the correct number." Use "space" to refer to white space.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: space

spec file (noun)

Description: "Spec files" are used as part of rebuilding RPMs. The spec file outlines how to configure and compile the RPM as well as how to install the files later.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: specfile

See also:

specific (noun)

Description: When used as a modifier, put a hyphen before "specific," for example, "Linux-specific" or "chip-specific."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Linux specific, chip specific, and so on

See also:

spelled (verb)

Description: "Spelled" is the past tense of "to spell" in U.S. English. Do not use the Commonwealth English variant "spelt."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: spelt

See also:

SQL (noun)

Description: "SQL" is an acronym for Structured Query Language. The ISO-standard SQL (ISO 9075 and its descendants) is pronounced "ess queue ell" and takes "an" as its indefinite article. Microsoft’s proprietary product, SQL Server, is pronounced as a word ("sequel") and takes "a" as its indefinite article. Oracle also pronounces its SQL-based products (such as PL/SQL) as "sequel." When referring to a specific Relational Database Management System (RDBMS), use the appropriate product name. For example, when discussing Microsoft SQL Server, write out the full name, "Microsoft SQL Server."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: MySQL

SR-IOV (noun)

Description: "SR-IOV" is an acronym for Single-Root I/O Virtualization. It is a virtualization specification that allows a PCIe device to appear to be multiple separate physical PCIe devices.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: SR/IOV

See also:

SSH (noun)

Description: "SSH" is an acronym for Secure Shell, which is a network protocol that allows data exchange using a secure channel. For the protocol, do not use "SSH," "ssh," "Ssh," or other variants. For the command, use "ssh." Do not use ssh as a verb; for example, write "Use SSH to connect to the remote server" instead of "ssh to the remote server."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: SSH as a verb

See also:

SSL (noun)

Description: "SSL" is an acronym for Secure Sockets Layer, which is a protocol developed by Netscape for transmitting private documents over the Internet. SSL uses a public key to encrypt data that is transferred over the SSL connection. The majority of web browsers support SSL. Many websites use the protocol to obtain confidential user information, such as credit card numbers. By convention, URLs that require an SSL connection start with https: instead of http:.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: SSL/TLS

SSL/TLS (noun)

Description: SSL/TLS refers to the Secure Socket Layer protocol (SSL) and its successor, the Transport Layer Security protocol (TLS). As both of these protocols are frequently called "SSL", always use "SSL/TLS" to avoid confusion.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: SSL, TLS, TLS/SSL

See also:

StarOffice (noun)

Description: "StarOffice" is a Linux desktop suite.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Star, Staroffice, Star Office

See also:

startx (noun)

Description: "startx" begins the xsession, which provides a graphical interface for running the session.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: StartX

See also:

straightforward (adjective)

Description: "Straightforward" means uncomplicated and easy to understand.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: straight forward, straight-forward

See also:

su (noun)

Description: "su" (superuser, switch user, or substitute user) is a Linux command to change the local user to the root user.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: SU

See also:

subcommand (noun)

Description: A "subcommand" is a secondary or even tertiary command used with a primary command. Do not confuse subcommands with options or arguments; subcommands operate on more focused objects or entities. In the following command, "hammer" is the primary command, "import" and "organization" are subcommands, and "--help" is an option: hammer import organization --help.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: sub-command

See also:

subdirectory (noun)

Description: A "subdirectory" is a directory located within another directory, similar to a folder beneath another folder in a graphical user interface (GUI).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: sub-directory

See also:

Description: A "submenu" is a secondary menu contained within another menu.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: sub-menu

See also:

subpackage (noun)

Description: "Subpackage" has a specific, specialized meaning in Red Hat products. An RPM spec file can define more than one package; these additional packages are called "subpackages." CCS strongly discourages any other use of subpackage. Subpackages are not the same as dependencies. Do not treat them as if they are.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: sub-package

See also:

subscription (noun)

Description: Subscriptions provide access to Red Hat products. Using Red Hat Subscription Management (RHSM), you register a system, attach a subscription, and enable repositories. Do not confuse this with Red Hat Network (RHN), where you subscribed to channels. Do not use "subscription" and "entitlement" interchangeably. See https://access.redhat.com/discussions/3119981 for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: entitlement

See also: entitlement, repository

sudo (noun)

Description: sudo is a command that allows a user to run a program as another user (the root user by default). When a user requires elevated privileges, using the phrase 'as the root user' prior to a command is preferred over prefixing commands with sudo.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: SUDO, Sudo

See also:

superuser (noun)

Description: Superuser is the same as the root user. The term is more common in Solaris documentation than Linux.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: super-user, super user

See also:

swap space (noun)

Description: A Linux system uses "swap space" when it needs more memory resources and the RAM is full. The system moves inactive pages to the swap space to free memory.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: swapspace

See also:

Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise (noun)

Description: Sybase Corporation developed Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise as a relational database management system that became part of SAP AG. Use SAP Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise (ASE) on the first use; on subsequent mentions, use "Sybase ASE." If discussing the high-availability version, use "Sybase ASE and High Availability."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

symmetric encryption (noun)

Description: "Symmetric encryption" is a type of encryption where the same key encrypts and decrypts the message. In contrast, asymmetric (or public-key) encryption uses one key to encrypt a message and another to decrypt the message.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

systemd (noun)

Description: Systemd is a "system and service manager" that is used as the default system daemon for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7+

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: system D, system D, SystemD, system d, Systemd (unless at the start of a sentence).

See also:

SysV (noun)

Description: The "SysV" init runlevel system provides a standard process for controlling which programs init launches or halts when initializing a runlevel.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Sys V, System V

See also:

T

terminal emulation (noun)

Description: "Terminal emulation" refers to making a computer respond like a particular type of terminal. Terminal emulation programs allow you to access a mainframe computer or bulletin board service with a personal computer.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

terminate (verb)

Description: To "terminate" means to stop or end a program.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: fail, crash

text mode (noun)

Description: "Text mode" is a video mode in which a display screen is divided into rows and columns of boxes. Each box can contain one character. Text mode is also called character mode.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: textmode, text-mode

See also:

text-based (adjective)

Description: Use "text-based" as an adjective when referring to a text-based operating system or interface.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: text based

See also:

thin-provisioned (adjective)

Description: "Thin-provisioning" is a mechanism that allocates disk storage space in a flexible manner, based on the minimum space required at any given time. Thin-provisioned storage is also referred to as "sparse" in some contexts.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: thin-provisioned, thinly provisioned, thinly-provisioned

See also:

third-party (adjective)

Description: Use "third-party" as the adjectival form. Consult a dictionary for more examples.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

third party (noun)

Description: Use "third party" as the nominal form. Consult a dictionary for more examples.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

through (preposition)

Description: Use "through" instead of a hyphen or any other type of dash when expressing a range.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: thru

See also:

throughput (noun)

Description: "Throughput" is the amount of data transferred from one place to another or processed in a specified amount of time. Data transfer rates for disk drives and networks are measured in terms of throughput. Typically, throughput is measured in kbps, Mbps, or Gbps. See The IBM Style Guide for more information about using measurements and abbreviations.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: thru

See also:

tier-1 (adjective)

Description: Always hyphenate "tier-1" and indicate the number in numeral form. Follow standard capitalization guidelines.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: tier-one, tier 1

See also:

time frame (noun)

Description: "Time frame" is a period of time with respect to some action or project. It is most commonly styled as two words.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: timeframe, time-frame

See also:

time zone (noun)

Description: "Time zone" is most commonly styled as two words.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: timezone, time-zone

See also:

totally (adverb)

Description: Do not use "totally."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: basically

TTL (noun)

Description: "TTL" is an acronym for "time to live" (noun) and "time-to-live" (adjective). The acronym is always in uppercase letters.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: ttl

time to live (noun)

Description: Do not capitalize "time to live" unless you are documenting a GUI field, label, or similar element, in which case you should use the same capitalization. Capitalization at the beginning of a sentence is acceptable.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: TTL, time-to-live

time-to-live (adjective)

Description: Do not capitalize "time-to-live" unless you are documenting a GUI field, label, or similar element, in which case you should use the same capitalization. Capitalization at the beginning of a sentence is acceptable.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: TTL, time to live

trusted Certificate Authority (noun)

Description: A "trusted Certificate Authority" is a third party that creates SSL certificates (CA certificates) used for authentication. It is not to be confused with self-signed certificates. Note the capitalization of Certificate Authority, commonly abbreviated as CA.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

type (noun)

Description: "Type" can be used as a noun, for example, "Print the data type of init."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: type (verb)

type (verb)

Description: "Type" can be used as a verb, for example, "To start Source-Navigator, type snavigator."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: type (noun)

U

UID (noun)

Description: "UID" is an abbreviation of user identifier. UID is a unique identifier associated with a single entity within a given system.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: uid

See also:

UltraSPARC (noun)

Description: "UltraSPARC" is a trademark of SPARC International, Inc. and is used under license by Sun Microsystems, Inc. Products bearing the SPARC trademarks are based upon an architecture developed by Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: ULTRASPARC, UltraSparc, or other variations.

See also:

uninterruptible (adjective)

Description: Although "uninterruptable" is not listed in the American Heritage Dictionary, it is listed in the Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary and is considered acceptable in Red Hat documentation, especially in the context of "uninterruptible power supply (UPS)."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

UNIX (noun)

Description: UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group. Do not use "UNIX-like"; use an expression such as "Linux, UNIX, and similar operating systems" instead.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Unix, unix, UNIX-like

See also:

unset (verb)

Description: Use "clear" instead of "unset," for example, "To disable the Wobbly Widget, clear the Enable Wobbly Widget check box." Another example is, "This rule only matches TCP packets that have the SYN flag set and the ACK flag cleared."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

untrusted (adjective)

Description: Use "untrusted" only in the context of security relationships, for example, web browsers often indicate that a site is untrusted if it cannot verify that site’s security certificate.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

upgrade (verb)

Description: "Upgrade" means to raise (something) to a higher standard, in particular to improve by adding or replacing components, for example, "Upgrade the RHEL version."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: up-grade, up grade

See also:

unmount (verb)

Description: "Unmount" means to make a disk inaccessible by the computer.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: un-mount, un mount

See also: mount

UPS (noun)

Description: "UPS" is an abbreviation of uninterruptible power supply, which is a power supply that includes a battery to maintain power in the event of a power outage.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

upsell (verb)

Description: As per http://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=upsell, "upsell" is the practice of offering customers additional or more expensive products or services after they have already agreed to buy something. No adjectival form is currently recognized.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: up-sell

See also:

upselling (noun)

Description: As per http://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=upsell, "upselling" is the practice of offering customers additional or more expensive products or services after they have already agreed to buy something. No adjectival form is currently recognized.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: up-selling, up selling

See also:

upstream (noun)

Description: "Upstream" is data sent from a customer to a network service provider. Use the one-word form for the nominal form.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: up-stream, up stream

upstream (adjective)

Description: "Upstream" is data sent from a customer to a network service provider. Use the one-word form for the adjectival form.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: up-stream, up stream

uptime (noun)

Description: "Uptime" is the time during which a computer or server is in operation. Use the one-word form.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: up-time, up time

See also:

URL (noun)

Description: "URL" is an acronym for Uniform Resource Locator. A URL provides a way to locate a resource on the web, the hypertext system that operates over the internet. The URL contains the name of the protocol to be used to access the resource and a resource name. Include the appropriate protocol, such as http, ftp, or https, at the beginning of URLs, that is, use http://www.redhat.com and not www.redhat.com.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: url

See also:

usable (adjective)

Description: "Usable" means something is capable of being used.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: useable

See also:

user (noun)

Description: When referring to the reader, use "you" instead of "user." If referring to more than one user, calling the collection "users" is acceptable, such as "Other users might want to access your database."

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

user name (noun)

Description: Use as shown, two words, except for instances in which the GUI uses the single word form (username).

Use it: yes, with exception for GUI.

Incorrect forms:

See also:

user space (noun)

Description: Use "user space" when used as a noun.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: userspace

See also: user-space

user-space (adjective)

Description: When used as a modifier, use the hyphenated form "user-space."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: userspace

See also: user space

V

VAR (noun)

Description: "VAR" is an acronym for value-added reseller, which is the equivalent of original equipment manufacturer (OEM).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: var

See also: OEM

vCPU (noun)

Description: "vCPU" is an acronym for a virtual central processing unit, which represents a portion of a physical CPU that is assigned to a virtual machine.

Use lowercase "v" and uppercase "CPU".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: VCPU, vcpu

See also:

VDSM (noun)

Description: "VDSM" is an acronym for Virtual Desktop Server Management. Do not spell out this acronym. Using the term "virtual desktop" in this context has negative marketing implications.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Virtual Desktop Server Management

See also:

verify (verb)

Description: "Verify" means to check that something is correct.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: make sure

See also:

vi (noun)

Description: "vi" is a screen-oriented text editor originally created for the Unix operating system. Do not use "VI."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: VI

See also: Vim

video mode (noun)

Description: "Video mode" is the setting of a video adapter. Most video adapters can run in either text mode or graphics mode. In text mode, a monitor can display only ASCII characters. In graphics mode, a monitor can display any bit-mapped image. In addition to the text and graphics modes, video adapters offer different modes of resolution and color depth.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: video-mode, videomode

See also:

Vim (noun)

Description: "Vim" is an acronym for Vi IMproved. In the original 1991 release for the Amiga platform, the acronym was derived from Vi IMitation. It became Vi IMproved when ported to various Unix-based operating systems in 1992. Despite being an acronym, and despite the first word of the "About" text that is displayed when you launch the editor, the standard, proper noun-derived, mixed-case spelling has been in use since its release on the Amiga.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: VIM, vim

See also: vi

virtual (adjective)

Description: "Virtual" is an adjective describing computer systems with hardware functions partially carried out in the software layer. It is preferred over virtualized, as it is simple, direct, and unambiguous.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: virtualized

virtual console (noun)

Description: "Virtual console" can be abbreviated to "VC" as long as the term has been introduced in the same content in its full version first, such as "A virtual console (VC) is a shell prompt in a non-graphical environment. Multiple VCs can be accessed simultaneously."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: virtual-console, Virtual Console

See also:

virtual floppy disk (noun)

Description: A "virtual floppy disk" is an alternative to the traditional floppy. It is an image file rather than a physical disk.

Although the IBM Style Guide recommends using "diskette" instead of "floppy disk," this term is outdated and refers to the physical disk. In the context of virtualization, "floppy disk" is the preferred term; the file extension, for example, is ".vfd."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: virtual diskette

virtual floppy drive (noun)

Description: A "virtual floppy drive" is the virtual hardware used to mount a floppy disk image.

Although the IBM Style Guide recommends using "diskette drive" instead of "floppy drive," this term is outdated and refers to the physical hardware. In the context of virtualization, "floppy drive" is the preferred term.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: virtual diskette drive

virtual machine (noun)

Description: "Virtual machine" refers to virtual hardware that consists of virtual CPUs, memory, devices, and so on. Do not use "guest virtual machine" unless you want to specifically emphasize the fact that it is a guest. Virtual machine can be abbreviated to "VM" as long as the term has been introduced in the same content in its full version first and provided there is no possibility of confusion with other terms, such as "virtual memory." Author discretion is recommended.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

virtual router (noun)

Description: A "virtual router" is an abstract object managed by the virtual router redundancy protocol (VRRP) that acts as a default router for hosts on a shared LAN. It consists of a Virtual Router Identifier and a set of associated IP addresses across a common LAN.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

virtualized (adjective)

Description: "Virtualized" is an adjective and a past-tense verb. It implies having undergone or been produced by a process. The distinction implies the possibility of a real (not virtual) counterpart.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: virtual

virtualized guest (noun)

Description: A "virtualized guest" is a virtual machine (VM). Use virtualized guest only when comparing a "fully virtualized guest" with a "paravirtualized guest."

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

VLAN (noun)

Description: "VLAN" is an abbreviation for virtual local area network. Use uppercase for all letters.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: vlan, vLAN

See also:

vNIC (noun)

Description: "vNIC" is an abbreviation for virtual network interface card. Use lowercase v and uppercase NIC for the abbreviation, but all lowercase for the expansion, except at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: vnic, VNIC, Virtual Network Interface Card

See also:

vNUMA node (noun)

Description: A virtual non-uniform memory access (vNUMA) node optimizes performance for a virtual machine (VM) by pinning vNUMA nodes on the VM to specific NUMA nodes on the host. You can optionally use virtual NUMA node instead of vNUMA node.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: vnuma, VNUMA

See also:

VPN (noun)

Description: "VPN" is an acronym for virtual private network, which is a network that is constructed by using public wires to connect nodes. For example, there are a number of systems that enable you to create networks using the Internet as the medium for transporting data. These systems use encryption and other security mechanisms to ensure that only authorized users can access the network and that the data cannot be intercepted.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: vpn

See also:

W

WAN (noun)

Description: "WAN" is an acronym for wide-area network, which is a computer network that spans a relatively large geographical area. Typically, a WAN consists of two or more local-area networks (LANs). Computers connected to a wide-area network are often connected through public networks, such as the telephone system. Connections can be through leased lines or satellites. The largest WAN in existence is the Internet.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: wan

See also:

WCA (noun)

Description: "WCA" is an acronym for web clipping application, which is an application that allows users to extract static information from a web server and load that data onto a web-enabled PDA. WCAs are also called query applications.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: wca

See also:

want (verb)

Description: Use "want" instead of "wish" or "would like." It is better to avoid it entirely by rewriting the sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: wish, would like

See also:

we suggest (verb)

Description: Do not use "we suggest." Use a more direct construction or use "recommend." For example, instead of "We suggest that you make a backup of your data disk," write "Back up your data disk," or "It is recommended that you back up your data disk."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: recommend

web UI (noun)

Description: Use "web UI" to refer to a browser-based interface to a software application, even if that application has no connection to the web. If necessary, spell out web UI on first use. Do not hyphenate the acronym or use the one-word form.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: web-UI, webUI

See also:

who (pronoun)

Description: Use the pronoun "who" as a subject, for example, "Who owns this?"

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: whom

whom (pronoun)

Description: Use the pronoun "whom" as a direct object, an indirect object, or the object of a preposition, for example, "To whom does this belong?"

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: who

will (verb)

Description: Do not use future tense unless it is absolutely necessary.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Window Maker (noun)

Description: "Window Maker" is a window manager for the X Window System. Do not combine Window Maker into one word or hyphenate the two words.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Window-Maker, WindowMaker

See also:

write (verb)

Description: Use "write" instead of "code" as a verb.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: code

See also:

X

X (noun)

Description: "X" is an alternative reference to the "X Window System." Do not use X by itself when referring to "XEmacs."

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: X (when referring to XEmacs only)

See also: XEmacs

XEmacs (noun)

Description: Use "xemacs" only when referring to a command, such as, "To start XEmacs, type xemacs."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Xemacs

See also:

Xen (adjective)

Description: "Xen Project" is a hypervisor using a microkernel design, providing services that allow multiple computer operating systems to execute on the same computer hardware concurrently. It was developed by the Linux Foundation and is supported by Intel. Use Xen Project when it accurately refers to the original Xen version of the package. If the Xen package we distribute is for all practical purposes the same as the upstream code, we can refer to the package we distribute as "Xen" in a referential way. A referential use is one that describes another entity’s goods or services, not our own, such as referring to Microsoft Windows as a technology we compete and integrate with. When referring to another entity’s trademark, always use good trademark practices. Only use the trademark as an adjective followed by the noun; do not use a logo form of the trademark; do not make it more prominent than our own marks; and do not incorporate the trademark into our own product names. The proper use is "Xen hypervisor." The Xen Trademark Policy is available at http://www.xenproject.org/trademark-policy.html.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

xterm (noun)

Description: "Xterm" is the standard terminal emulator for the X Window System. Do not use Xterm unless the word is used at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Xterm

See also:

X Window System (noun)

Description: "X Window System" is a windowing system for bitmap displays, common on Unix-like computer operating systems. It is also referred to as X. When making multiple references to the X Window System, on first mention spell out, with shortened references following. For example, "Reinstalling the X Window System (X) is not necessary if…​. To start an X session, from the shell prompt…​."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: X Windowns

See also: X

Y

YAML (noun)

Description: "YAML" is the recursive acronym for YAML Ain’t Markup Language, after originally being said to mean Yet Another Markup Language. YAML is a human-readable data serialization standard for all programming languages.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: yaml

See also:

you (noun)

Description: Do not use the first-person pronoun "I" or the third-person pronouns "he" or "she."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: I, he, she

See also:

Z

zSeries (noun)

Description: "IBM Z" is the correct usage. Do not use "S/390x," "s390x," "IBM zSeries," or "zSeries."

Use it: no

Incorrect forms: S/390x, s390x, IBM zSeries, zSeries

See also: IBM Z, IBM S/390

z-stream (noun)

Description: "z-stream" refers to the z in an x.y.z product version numbering schema. Use only if required for generic reference to a release and the term is in use already by the product. In all other instances refer to the specific release number.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: micro release

Symbols

ampersand (&)

Description: Ampersands ("&") can be used in design elements and graphics when space is limited and when either referring to or quoting third-party content that uses them. Do not use an ampersand in original body copy.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

exclamation point (!)

Description: Do not use exclamation points ("!") at the end of sentences. An exclamation point can be used when referring to a command, such as the bang (!) command.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also:

plus symbol (+)

Description: Plus symbols ("+") can be used in design elements and graphics when space is limited and when either referring to or quoting third-party content that uses them. Do not use a plus symbol in original body copy.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Product-specific Conventions

The following sections contain conventions specific to particular Red Hat products. Product documentation teams are responsible for these sections. Product-specific terms must be defined by the individual writing team responsible for that product, and usage should be consistent within that product documentation. Terms that might be used by more than one product team should be proposed as additions to the General Conventions chapter.

Each product portfolio and product has an official name and an approved abbreviated name. Some products have multiple component names that also have an approved or accepted usage. It is important to use these names consistently when referring to products in the documentation. For information on official product naming, including long- and short-form names, please contact naming@redhat.com.

Product teams are not expected to maintain third-party (non-Red Hat) product names and terms in this document, and these names and terms must always be confirmed by checking that third party’s own sources (for example, the third party’s website or documentation) or by discussion with a third-party representative.

Azure and .NET Core

Azure CLI 2.0 (noun)

Description: "Azure CLI 2.0" is a set of open source commands for managing Microsoft Azure platform resources. Typing az at the CLI command prompt lists each of the many Microsoft Azure subcommands. Azure CLI 2.0 is the most current command-line interface and is replacing Microsoft Azure Xplat-CLI.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Azure Resource Manager (noun)

Description: The "Azure Resource Manager" (ARM) is a Microsoft Azure management mode that deploys, manages, and monitors resources in the Microsoft Azure portal. ARM mode is the default for Azure CLI 2.0. Microsoft Azure resources can be managed remotely from a Red Hat Enterprise Linux server. ARM replaces Azure Service Management (ASM) as the preferred mode for managing resources in Microsoft Azure.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Azure Service Management (noun)

Description: "Azure Service Management" (ASM) is a Microsoft Azure management mode that deploys, manages, and monitors resources in the Microsoft Azure portal. The Azure Resource Manager (ARM) has replaced ASM as the preferred method for managing Azure resources.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Hyper-V (noun)

Description: "Hyper-V" is a native hypervisor. Hyper-V can create virtual machines (VMs) on AMD64 systems running the Microsoft Windows operating system. Hyper-V drivers are required on all Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) VMs running in Microsoft Azure.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: hypervisor

Microsoft Azure (noun)

Description: "Microsoft Azure" is a cloud computing platform and infrastructure for building, deploying, and managing applications and services through a global network of Microsoft-managed datacenters. (source: wikipedia). Always refer to it as Microsoft Azure to provide clarity unless the term is repeated multiple times in a sentence or paragraph.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Azure

See also:

Microsoft Azure Cross-Platform Command-Line Interface (noun)

Description: The "Microsoft Azure Cross-Platform Command-Line Interface" (Xplat-CLI) is a set of open source, cross-platform commands for managing Microsoft Azure platform resources. The Xplat-CLI has several top-level commands that correspond to Microsoft Azure features. Typing azure at the Xplat-CLI command prompt lists each of the many Microsoft Azure subcommands. When using the Xplat-CLI, a user can enable ARM mode or ASM mode.

Azure CLI 2.0 is the most current command-line interface and is replacing Xplat-CLI. Do not use all uppercase letters for Xplat, and do not use any other variant of Xplat-CLI.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: xplat-cli, x-plat-cli, xplat cli, x-plat cli, X-PLAT CLI, X-PLAT-CLI, XPLAT-CLI, XPLAT CLI

See also: Azure CLI 2.0

Microsoft Azure On-Demand Marketplace (noun)

Description: The "Microsoft Azure On-Demand Marketplace" is a Microsoft Azure storefront where users can locate and quickly install operating systems, programming languages, frameworks, tools, databases, and devices into their Microsoft Azure environment. Red Hat Enterprise Linux is available as a VM image within the Microsoft Azure On-Demand Marketplace, along with other Red Hat open source products. Always preface On-Demand Marketplace with Microsoft Azure to provide clarity unless the term is repeated multiple times in a sentence or paragraph.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: On-Demand Marketplace

See also:

Microsoft Azure portal (noun)

Description: The "Microsoft Azure portal" is a unified console graphical user interface (GUI) that allows users to build, manage, and monitor resources, web apps, and cloud applications. Do not capitalize portal; this is how Microsoft presents the portal’s name.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Microsoft Azure Portal

.NET Core (noun)

Description: Microsoft’s newest development platform, ".NET Core," is an open source and cross-platform framework for building cloud-based internet-connected applications, such as web apps, IoT apps, and mobile backends. All .NET Core applications can run on .NET Core or on the full .NET Framework. Always refer to it as .NET Core; all other variants are incorrect.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: dotNet Core, .Net Core, .NET, .Net

See also:

provisioning (verb)

Description: When discussing virtual machines (VMs), "provisioning" refers to a set of actions to prepare a VM with appropriate configuration options, data, and software to make it ready for operating in a cloud environment. In Microsoft Azure, RHEL VMs are provisioned using Azure CLI 2.0 or using the Azure Resource Manager (ARM) in the Microsoft Azure portal.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Red Hat Cloud Access (noun)

Description: "Red Hat Cloud Access" is a Red Hat partner program that allows customers to use their Red Hat subscriptions to build resources and import images on qualified Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Providers (CCSPs).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

virtual hard drive (noun)

Description: A "virtual hard drive" (VHD) is file format that represents a virtual hard disk drive (HDD). It contains elements typically found on a physical HDD, such as disk partitions and a file system, which in turn can contain files and folders. VHD files have the extension .vhd. VHD is the required image format for all virtual machine images used in Microsoft Azure. Do not use virtual hard disk as a synonym.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: virtual hard disk

See also:

Note

See the Microsoft Azure glossary for additional terms and definitions.

Red Hat AMQ

Responsible person: Ben Hardesty (bhardest@redhat.com)

acceptor (noun)

Description: An acceptor defines the way a client can connect to a broker instance.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

AMQ (noun)

Description: The short product name for Red Hat AMQ.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: A-MQ, JBoss AMQ, Red Hat A-MQ, Red Hat AMQ

See also: Red Hat AMQ

AMQ Broker (noun)

Description: A component of Red Hat AMQ, it is a full-featured, message-oriented middleware broker. It offers specialized queueing behaviors, message persistence, and manageability.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: A-MQ Broker, The AMQ Broker, Red Hat Broker, JBoss Broker

AMQ Clients (noun)

Description: A suite of messaging libraries supporting multiple languages and platforms. It enables users to write messaging applications that send and receive messages. AMQ Clients is a component of Red Hat AMQ.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: A-MQ Clients, Red Hat Clients, JBoss Clients

AMQ Console (noun)

Description: A management tool for administering AMQ brokers and routers in a single graphical interface.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: A-MQ Console, Red Hat Console, JBoss Console

See also:

AMQ Core Protocol JMS (noun)

Description: The "AMQ Core Protocol JMS" is an implementation of the Java Message Service (JMS) using the ActiveMQ Artemis Core protocol. This is sometimes called Core JMS.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: JMS, Core protocol

AMQ Interconnect (noun)

Description: A component of Red Hat AMQ, it is a messaging router that provides flexible routing of messages between any AMQP-enabled endpoints, whether they are clients, servers, brokers, or any other entity that can send or receive standard AMQP messages.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Interconnect, Router, A-MQ Interconnect, Red Hat Interconnect, JBoss Interconnect

See also: router

AMQP (noun)

Description: Advanced Message Queuing Protocol. It is an open standard for passing business messages between applications or organizations (https://www.amqp.org/about/what). AMQ Broker supports AMQP, and AMQ Interconnect uses AMQP to route messages and links.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Artemis (noun)

Description: The upstream project for AMQ Broker (Apache ActiveMQ Artemis). When referring to AMQ Broker, always use the Red Hat product name.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: AMQ Broker

Description: An AMQ Interconnect configurable entity that defines a link between the router and a queue, topic, or service in an external broker.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: auto-link, AutoLink

See also:

broker distribution (noun)

Description: The platform-independent AMQ Broker archive containing the product binaries and libraries.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

broker instance (noun)

Description: A configurable instance of AMQ Broker. Each broker instance is a separate directory containing its own runtime and configuration data. Use this term to refer to the instance, not the product.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

broker cluster (noun)

Description: A group of brokers to be grouped together in order to share message processing load. In JBoss A-MQ 6, this was called a network of brokers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

brokered messaging (noun)

Description: Any messaging configuration that uses a message broker to deliver messages to destinations. Brokered messaging can include brokers only, or a combination of brokers and routers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

client application (noun)

Description: An application or server that connects to broker instances, routers, or both to send or receive messages. This should not be confused with AMQ Clients, which is the messaging library used to create the client application.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

connection (noun)

Description: A channel for communication between two peers on a network. For AMQ, connections can be made between containers (clients, brokers, and routers). These are sometimes also called network connections.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

connection factory (noun)

Description: An object used by a JMS client to create a connection to a broker.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

connector (noun)

Description: A configurable entity for AMQ brokers and routers. They define an outgoing connection from either a router to another endpoint, or from a broker to another endpoint.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: connection

consumer (noun)

Description: A client that receives messages.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: client application

container (noun)

Description: A top-level application, such as a broker or client. Connections are established between containers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: connection

Core API (noun)

Description: The "Core API" is an API for the ActiveMQ Artemis Core protocol. It is not supported by AMQ Broker.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Core protocol (noun)

Description: The "Core protocol" is the native messaging protocol for ActiveMQ Artemis.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

delivery (noun)

Description: The process by which a message is sent to a receiver. Delivery includes the message content and metadata, and the protocol exchange required to transfer that content. When the delivery is completed, it is settled.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: message settlement

destination (noun)

Description: In JMS, this is a named location for messages, such as a queue or a topic. Clients use destinations to specify the queue or topic from which to send or receive messages. Only use this term in the context of JMS. In all other instances, use address.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: message address

direct routed messaging (noun)

Description: A messaging configuration that uses routers only to deliver messages to destinations. This can also be called routed messaging.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Dispatch Router (noun)

Description: The upstream component for AMQ Interconnect (Apache Qpid Dispatch Router). When referring to AMQ Interconnect, always use the Red Hat product name.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: AMQ Interconnect

JMS (noun)

Description: The Java Message Service API for sending messages between clients.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Description: A message path between endpoints. Links are established over connections, and are responsible for tracking the exchange status of the messages that flow through them.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Description: A routing mechanism in AMQ Interconnect. A link route is a set of links that represent a private message path between a sender and receiver. Link routes can traverse multiple brokers and routers. With link routing, a router makes a routing decision when it receives link-attach frames, and it enables the sender and receiver to use the full AMQP link protocol.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: message routing

listener (noun)

Description: A configurable entity for AMQ routers and messaging APIs. A listener defines a context for accepting multiple, incoming connections on a particular TCP address and port.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: connection

live-only (noun)

Description: Live-broker is a broker high availability policy for scaling down brokers. If a live-only broker is shut down, its messages and transaction state are copied to another live broker.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: live only

See also:

master-slave group (noun)

Description: A broker high availability configuration in which a master broker is linked to slave brokers. If a failover event occurs, the slave broker(s) take over the master broker’s workload.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: live-backup group

See also:

master broker (noun)

Description: The broker that serves client requests in a master-slave group.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: live broker

message (noun)

Description: A mutable holder of application content.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

message address (noun)

Description: The name of a source or destination endpoint for messages within the messaging network. Message addresses can designate entities such as queues and topics. The term address is also acceptable, but should not be confused with TCP/IP addresses. In JMS, the term destination may be used.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: destination

message routing (noun)

Description: A routing mechansim in AMQ Interconnect. A message route is the message distribution pattern to be used for a message address. With message routing, a router makes a routing decision on a per-message basis when a message arrives.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: link routing

message settlement (noun)

Description: The process for confirming that a message delivery has been completed, and propagating that confirmation to the appropriate endpoints. The term settlement is also acceptable.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: delivery

messaging API (noun)

Description: The client libraries and APIs used to create client applications. These libraries are provided by AMQ Clients.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

MQTT (noun)

Description: MQ Telemetry Transport protocol. It is a lightweight, client-to-server, publish/subscribe messaging protocol (http://mqtt.org/). AMQ Broker supports MQTT.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

OpenWire (noun)

Description: A cross-language wire protocol that enables JMS clients to communicate with AMQ Broker (http://activemq.apache.org/openwire.html).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

peer-to-peer messaging (noun)

Description: A messaging operation in which a client sends messages directly to another client without using a broker or router. This term should only be used to refer to client-to-client communication, not direct routed messaging.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

producer (noun)

Description: A client that sends messages.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: client application

qdmanage (noun)

Description: A generic AMQP management client used for managing AMQ Interconnect.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Qdmanage, QDMANAGE

See also:

qdstat (noun)

Description: A management client used for monitoring the status of an AMQ Interconnect router network.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Qdstat, QDSTAT

See also:

queue (noun)

Description: A stored sequence of messages. In AMQ, queues are hosted on brokers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

receiver (noun)

Description: A channel for receiving messages from a source.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: consumer, source, sender

Red Hat AMQ (noun)

Description: A lightweight messaging platform that delivers information and easily integrates applications. It consists of several components (message broker, interconnect router, and clients) that support a variety of configurations. Always use the full product name (Red Hat AMQ) or short product name (AMQ).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: A-MQ, AMQ, Red Hat A-MQ, Red Hat JBoss AMQ

See also: AMQ

router (noun)

Description: A configurable instance of AMQ Interconnect. Routers are application layer programs that route AMQP messages between message producers and consumers. Routers are typically deployed in networks of multiple routers with redundant paths. When using this term, be careful not to confuse it with network device routers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: AMQ Interconnect

routing mechanism (noun)

Description: The type of routing to be used for an address. Routing mechanisms include message routing and link routing.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

routing pattern (noun)

Description: The path messages sent to a particular address can take across the network. Messages can be distributed in balanced, closest, and multicast routing patterns.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

sender (noun)

Description: A channel for sending messages to a target.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: producer, target, receiver

session (noun)

Description: A serialized context for producing and consuming messages. Sessions are established between AMQ peers over connections. Sending and receiving links are established over sessions. Use this term with caution, as users typically do not need to understand it to use AMQ.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: connection

sharded queue (noun)

Description: A distributed queue in which a single logical queue is hosted on multiple brokers. Routers are typically used with sharded queues to enable clients to access the entire sharded queue instead of only a single shard of the queue.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: queue

slave broker (noun)

Description: In a master-slave group, this is the broker (or brokers) that takes over for the master broker to which it is linked.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: passive broker

source (noun)

Description: A message’s named point of origin.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: target

SSL/TLS (noun)

Description: The Secure Socket Layer protocol (SSL) and its successor, the Transport Layer Security protocol (TLS). As both of these protocols are frequently called "SSL", always use "SSl/TLS" to avoid confusion.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: SSL, TLS, TLS/SSL

See also:

STOMP (noun)

Description: Simple (or Streaming) Text Oriented Message Protocol. It is a text-oriented wire protocol that enables STOMP clients to communicate with STOMP brokers. AMQ Broker can accept connections from STOMP clients.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

target (noun)

Description: A message’s destination. This is usually a queue or topic.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: source

topic (noun)

Description: A stored sequence of messages for read-only distribution.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Red Hat Ceph Storage

Responsible person: Bára Ančincová (bara@redhat.com), backup contact ceph-docs@redhat.com

bucket (noun)

Description: 1) A bucket in the S3 API contains objects. A bucket also defines access control lists (ACLs). Unlike folders or directories, buckets cannot contain other buckets. A bucket in the S3 API is synonymous with a "container" in the Swift API. 2) The term bucket is also sometimes used in the context of a CRUSH hierarchy, but CRUSH buckets and S3 buckets are mutually exclusive concepts.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: container

bucket index (noun)

Description: A bucket index in the S3 API contains an index of objects within the bucket. The bucket index enables listing the bucket’s contents.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

bucket sharding (noun)

Description: Bucket sharding is a process of breaking down a bucket index into smaller more manageable shards. Bucket sharding improves performance.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: shard

BlueStore (noun)

Description: BlueStore is an OSD back end that utilizes block devices directly.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: bluestore, Blue Store

See also: FileStore, Object Store

Ceph (noun)

Description: Ceph is a unified, distributed storage system designed for excellent performance, reliability and scalability.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CEPH, ceph

ceph (noun)

Description: The Ceph command-line utility. Always mark it properly (ceph).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CEPH

Ceph Block Device (noun)

Description: The block storage component of Ceph. Also known as the RADOS Block Device, however prefer using the Ceph Block Device.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ceph block device, Ceph block devices

CephFS (noun)

Description: CephFS is an initialization for the Ceph File System.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: cephfs

See also: Ceph File System

Ceph File System (noun)

Description: The POSIX file system component of Ceph.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ceph filesystem, Ceph file system

See also: Ceph File System

Ceph Monitor (noun)

Description: A node where the ceph-mon daemon is running.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ceph monitor

See also: ceph-mon

ceph-ansible (noun)

Description: ceph-ansible is a utility that provides Ansible playbooks for installing, managing, and upgrading the Ceph Storage Cluster. Always mark it properly (ceph-ansible).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ceph Ansible

See also:

ceph-mds (noun)

Description: ceph-mds is the Metadata Server daemon. One or more instances of ceph-mds collectively manage the file system namespace, coordinating access to the shared OSD cluster. Always mark it properly (ceph-mds)

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Metadata Server, MDS

ceph-mon (noun)

Description: ceph-mon is the Ceph Monitor daemon. Always mark it properly (ceph-mon).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Ceph Monitor

ceph-osd (noun)

Description: ceph-osd is the Ceph object storage daemon that is responsible for storing objects on local file system and providing access to them over network. Always mark it properly (ceph-osd).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Ceph Object Gateway (noun)

Description: The S3/Swift component of Ceph. Also known as RADOS gateway. However, prefer using the Ceph Object Gateway.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ceph object gateway, Ceph object gateways

ceph-radosgw (noun)

Description: The ceph-radosgw daemon runs on Ceph Object Gateway nodes. Each instance provides a Civetweb web server and the object gateway functionality.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

container (noun)

See container in the General Conventions part.

CRUSH (noun)

Description: Abbreviation for Controlled Replication Under Scalable Hashing. This is the mechanism of data distribution in a Ceph cluster. Use all capital letters when referring to CRUSH. Do not expand, only when explaining what the abbreviation means. See the CRUSH section in the Red Hat Ceph Storage Architecture Guide for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: CRUSH map

CRUSH map (noun)

Description: A CRUSH map contain a list of OSDs, a list of buckets for aggregating the devices into physical locations, and a list of rules that tell CRUSH how it should replicate data in a Ceph cluster’s pools. See the CRUSH section in the Red Hat Ceph Storage Architecture Guide for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: crush map, crushmap

See also: CRUSH

FileStore (noun)

Description: FileStore is an OSD back end responsible for the OSD data that writes objects as files on a file system.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: filestore, File Store

See also: BlueStore

federated (adjective)

Description: In Red Hat Ceph Storage 1.3, you can configure the Ceph Object Gateway to participate in a federated architecture with multiple regions and with multiple zones for a region.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: multisite

indexless bucket (noun)

Description: A bucket that does not maintain an index.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: bucket index

librados (noun)

Description: A shared library allowing applications to access the RADOS object store.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Librados, LIBRADOS

See also: RADOS

librbd (noun)

Description: A shared library allowing applications to access Ceph Block Devices.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Librbd, LIBRBD

MDS (noun)

Description: MDS is an acronym for the Ceph Metadata Server.

Use it: yes

Class: noun

Incorrect forms:

Metadata Server (noun)

Description: Another name of the ceph-mds daemon.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: MDS, ceph-mds

multisite (adjective)

Description: You can configure the Ceph Object Gateway to participate in a multisite architecture that consists of one zone group and multiple zones each zone with one or more ceph-radosgw instances. See the Multisite chapter in the Red Hat Ceph Storage 2 Object Gateway Guide for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: multi site, multi-site

See also: federated

Object Store (noun)

Description: A core component of the Ceph Storage Cluster. Also referred as RADOS.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: RADOS

Object Storage Device (noun)

Description: A storage drive in a Ceph Storage Cluster. Do not confuse Object Storage Device with the Ceph OSD, which is the ceph-osd daemon and the underlying data disk.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: ceph-osd, OSD, OSD daemon

OSD Daemon (noun)

Description: Another name of the ceph-osd daemon.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

OSD (noun)

Description: The ceph-osd daemon and the underlying data disk.

Use it: yes

See also:

PG (noun)

Description: An acronym for Placement Group.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: placement group

placement group (noun)

Description: Aggregates a series of objects into a group, and maps the group into a series of OSDs. Write "Placement Group" (both first letters in uppercase) only when explaining the PC acronym, then write "placement group" (in lowercase). See the Placement Groups section in the Red Hat Ceph Storage Architecture Guide for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: PC

placement target (noun)

Description: A configurable rule that determines where bucket data is stored.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

pool (noun)

Description: A logical unit in which Ceph stores data. You can create pools for particular types of data, such as for Ceph Block Devices, Ceph Object Gateways, or simply just to separate one group of users from another. See the Pools chapter in the Red Hat Ceph Storage Architecture Guide for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

RADOS (noun)

Description: Acronym for Reliable Autonomic Distributed Object Storage. A core component of the Ceph Storage Cluster. Do not expand, unless explaining what the acronym means. Also referred as Object Store.

Use it: yes

Class: noun

Incorrect forms: rados

See also: Object Store

RADOS Block Device (noun)

Description: The block storage component of Ceph. Also known as the Ceph Block Device, which is the preferred form. Use RADOS Block Device only when expanding the RBD acronym.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: RADOS block device

RADOS Gateway (noun)

Description: The S3/Swift component of Ceph. Also known as the Ceph Object Gateway, which is the preferred form. Use RADOS Gateway only when expanding the RGW acronym.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: RadosGW, RADOS gateway

RBD (noun)

Description: Acronym for RADOS Block Device.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: rbd

rbd (noun)

Description: A command to create, list, introspect, and remove Ceph Block Device images. Always mark it properly (rbd).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

realm (noun)

Description: A realm is a namespace context for storing a multisite configuration. The notion of a realm enables Ceph to provide multiple namespaces in the same cluster.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: zone group

region (noun)

Description: A region is the deprecated term for referring to a zone group. Red Hat Ceph Storage 1.3 uses regions.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: zone group

Red Hat Ceph Storage (noun)

Description: Red Hat Ceph Storage is a Red Hat offering of the Ceph storage system.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Ceph

RGW (noun)

Description: Acronym for RADOS Gateway.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

scrubbing (noun)

Description: Scrubbing is a process when Ceph OSD Daemons compare object metadata in one placement group with its replicas in placement groups stored on other OSD node. See the Scrubbing section in the Red Hat Ceph Architecture Guide for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

shard (noun)

Description: A database shard is a horizontal partition of data in a database or search engine. Each individual partition is referred to as a shard or database shard. Each shard is held on a separate database server instance, to spread load.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: bucket sharding

snap (noun)

Description: A snap is the snapshot ID of an object. The only writable version of the object is called head. If an object is a clone, this field includes its sequential ID. Always mark it properly (snap).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: snapshot set

snapshot set (noun)

Description: The snapshot set stores information about a snapshot as a list of key-values pairs. The pairs are called attributes of a snapshot set.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: snapset, snapsets

See also: snap

zone (noun)

Description: A zone represents a physical location consisting of a Ceph Storage Cluster and nodes running the Ceph Object Gateway daemons.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: zone group

zone group (noun)

Description: A zone group is a list of zones. A zone group always has one master zone, and can have multiple secondary zones. A realm has one master zone group, which manages users and metadata for the realm.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: zonegroup, zone-group

See also: zone, realm, region

Red Hat CloudForms

Red Hat CloudForms (noun)

Description: Red Hat CloudForms enables enterprises to meet insight, control and automation needs in building and managing virtual infrastructure. Use "Red Hat CloudForms" in the first instance and "CloudForms" in all subsequent instances.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CloudForms Management Engine, CFME

See also:

Red Hat CloudForms Appliance (noun)

Description: A virtual machine where the virtual management database (VMDB) and Red Hat CloudForms reside. Use "Red Hat CloudForms" in the first documentation instance and "the appliance" in subsequent instances.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CloudForms Management Engine, CFME

See also:

Appliance console (noun)

Description: The appliance console is a command-line based interface into the Red Hat CloudForms appliance used for set-up and configuration.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Appliance Console

See also:

Red Hat CloudForms server (noun)

Description: The application that runs on the Red Hat CloudForms appliance and communicates with the SmartProxy and the VMDB.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

SmartState analysis (noun)

Description: Process run by the SmartProxy which collects the details of a virtual machine or instance. Such details include accounts, drivers, network information, hardware, and security patches. This process is also run by the Red Hat CloudForms server on hosts and clusters. The data is stored in the VMDB.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Smart State, smart state, Smart state, Smartstate, Analysis.

See also:

Virtual Management Database (VMDB) (noun)

Description: Database used by the Red Hat CloudForms appliance to store information about your resources, users, and anything else required to manage your virtual enterprise. Use Virtual Management Database (VMDB) in the first instance and VMDB in subsequent instances.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Worker Appliance (noun)

Description: A Red Hat CloudForms appliance dedicated to a role other than User Interface or database.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Red Hat JBoss BRMS and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite

Responsible person: Vidya Iyengar (viyengar@redhat.com), backup contact brms-docs@redhat.com.

asset (noun)

Description: An "asset" is anything that can be stored as a version in the artifact repository. Assets can be business rules, packages, business processes, decision tables, fact models, or domain-specific language (DSL) files.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

backward chaining (verb)

Description: "Backward chaining" is a feature of the rule engine. The backward chaining process is often referred to as derivation queries. It is not as common compared to reactive systems because Red Hat JBoss BRMS is primarily reactive forward chaining, that is, it responds to changes in your data. The backward chaining added to the rule engine is for product-like derivations.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Business Central (noun)

Description: The "Business Central" is a web-based user interface used for both Red Hat JBoss BRMS and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite. It is the user interface for the business rules manager and has been combined with the core Drools engine and other tools. It enables a business user to manage rules in a multi-user environment and implement changes in a controlled fashion.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Central, BC

See also:

Business Resource Planner (noun)

Description: The "Business Resource Planner" is a lightweight, embeddable, planning engine that optimizes planning problems. It helps Java TM programmers solve planning problems efficiently, and it combines optimization heuristics and metaheuristics with very efficient score calculations.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Resource Planner, Planner

See also:

business process (noun)

Description: A "business process" is a collection of related, structured tasks that results in achieving a specific target. It is presented as as a flowchart comprising a sequence steps necessary to achieve business goals.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

business rule (noun)

Description: A "business rule" defines a particular aspect of a business that is intended to assert business structure or influence the behaviour of a business. Business rules often focus on access control issues and pertain to business calculations and policies of an organization.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

data enumeration (noun)

Description: "Data enumeration" is an optional type of asset that can be configured to provide drop-down lists for the guided decision table editor.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: enum

See also:

data model (noun)

Description: "Data model" is a model of a data object. A data object is a custom complex data type, such as a Person object with data fields Name, Address, and Date of Birth.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: pojo

See also:

Data Modeler (noun)

Description: The "Data Modeler" is a built-in editor for creating facts or data objects as part of a project data model from Business Central. Data objects are custom data types implemented as Java objects. These custom data types can be used in any resource (such as a guided decision table) after they have been imported.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

decision table (noun)

Description: A "decision table" is a collection of rules stored in either a spreadsheet or in the Red Hat JBoss BRMS user interface.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

decision tree (noun)

Description: A "decision tree" is a graphical representation of a decision model in a tree-like manner.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

DRL (noun)

Description: "DRL" is an acronym for the Drools Rule Language, which is a file with the .drl extension. A DRL file stores technical rules as text and can be managed in the Red Hat Red Hat JBoss BRMS user interface. A DRL file contains one or more rules.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: drl

See also:

DSL (noun)

Description: "DSL" is an acronym for domain-specific language. DSL is used to create a rule language that is dedicated to your problem domain. A set of DSL definitions consists of transformations from DSL sentences to DRL constructs. These constructs let you use all of the underlying rule language and engine features. You can write rules in DSL rule (DSLR) files, which are translated into DRL files.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: dsl

See also:

Drools Expert (noun)

Description: The "Drools Expert" is a pattern matching-based rule engine that runs on Java EE application servers, Red Hat JBoss BRMS platform, or bundled with Java applications. It comprises an inference engine, a production memory, and a working memory. Rules are stored in the production memory, and the facts that the inference engine matches the rules against are stored in the working memory.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

guided editor (noun)

Description: The "guided editor" is an editor for creating and editing business rules. Rules edited in the guided editor use the Business Rules Language (BRL) format. The guided editor prompts users for input based on the object model of the rule being edited.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Editor, GUI editor, Business Central editor

See also: Business Central

inference engine (noun)

Description: The "inference engine" is a part of the Red Hat JBoss BRMS engine, which matches production facts and data to rules. It is often called the brain of a production rules system because it is able to scale to a large number of rules and facts. It makes inferences based on its existing knowledge and performs the actions based on what it infers from the information.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: BRMS engine, engine

See also:

Intelligent Process Server (noun)

Description: The "Intelligent Process Server" is a standalone, out-of-the-box component that can be used to instantiate and execute rules and processes. The Intelligent Process Server is created as a WAR file that can be deployed on any web container.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Kie server

See also:

KJAR (noun)

Description: Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite provides a simplified and complete deployment mechanism that is based entirely on Apache Maven artifacts. These artifacts, also known as "KJARs", are simple jar files that include a descriptor for the KIE system to produce KieBase and KieSession. The KJAR descriptor is represented as the kmodule.xml file.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kjar, kJAR

See also:

KIE (noun)

Description: "KIE" is an acronym for Knowledge Is Everything. KIE is a knowledge solution for Red Hat JBoss BRMS and JBoss BPM Suite and is used for the generic parts of a unified API, such as building, deploying, and loading.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kie, Kie, knowledge

See also:

KIE API (noun)

Description: The "KIE API" is a knowledge-centric API, where rules and processes are first class citizens. KIE is used for the generic parts of unified API, such as building, deploying, and loading.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kie, Kie, knowledge API

See also:

KIE base (noun)

Description: The "KIE base" is a repository of the application’s knowledge definitions. The name of the Java object is KieBase. It contains rules, processes, functions, and type models. A KIE base does not contain runtime data; instead KIE sessions are created from the KieBase into which data can be inserted and process instances started.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: kbase, knowledge base

See also:

KIE session (noun)

Description: A "KIE session" stores runtime data created from a KIE base. The name of the Java object is KieSession. After the KIE base is loaded, a session can be created to interact with the engine. The session can then be used to start new processes and signal events.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: ksession, knowledge session

See also:

knowledge store (noun)

Description: "Knowledge store" is a centralized repository for your business knowledge. The knowledge store connects to the Git repository to store various knowledge assets and artifacts at a single location.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

organizational unit (noun)

Description: An "organizational unit" is a directory comprising repositories that store business assets.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

package (noun)

Description: A "package" is a deployable collection of assets. Rules and other assets must be collected into a package before they can be deployed. When a package is built, the assets contained in the package are validated and compiled into a deployable package.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

project (noun)

Description: A "project" is a container that comprises packages of assets (business processes, rules, work definitions, decision tables, fact models, data models, and DSLs) and is located in the knowledge repository. This container defines the properties of the KIE base and KIE session that are applied to its content. You can edit these entities in the project editor in Business Central.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Realtime Decision Server (noun)

Description: The "Realtime Decision Server" is a standalone, built-in component that can be used to instantiate and execute rules through interfaces available for REST, JMS, or a Java client-side applications. Created as a web deployable WAR file, this server can be deployed on any web container. The current version of the Realtime Decision Server is included with default extensions for both Red Hat JBoss BRMS and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Decision Server, Kie Server

See also:

Red Hat JBoss BRMS (noun)

Description: "Red Hat JBoss BRMS" is a comprehensive platform for business rules management, business resource optimization, and complex event processing (CEP). BRMS stands for Business Rules Management System. Organizations can use Red Hat JBoss BRMS to incorporate sophisticated decision logic into line-of-business applications and quickly update underlying business rules as market conditions change.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: BRMS, BRM, JBoss BRMS

See also:

Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite (noun)

Description: "Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite" is the JBoss platform for Business Process Management (BPM). It enables enterprise business and IT users to document, simulate, manage, automate, and monitor business processes and policies. It is designed to empower business and IT users to collaborate more effectively, so business applications can be changed more easily and quickly.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: BPMS, BPM, JBoss BPMS

See also:

rule (noun)

Description: A "rule" provides the logic for the rule engine to execute against. A rule includes a name, attributes, a “when” statement on the left side of the rule, and a “then” statement on the right side of the rule.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: technical rule

See also:

rule template (noun)

Description: A "rule template" enables the user to define a rule structure. Rule templates provide a placeholder for values and data, and they populate templates to generate many rules.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

runtime manager (noun)

Description: The "runtime manager" is an interface that enables and simplifies the usage of a KIE API within the processes. The name of the interface is RuntimeManager. It provides configurable strategies that control actual runtime execution.The strategies are singleton, per request, and per process instance.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: KIE API

Scorecard (noun)

Description: "Scorecard" is a risk management tool that is a graphical representation of a formula used to calculate an overall score. It is mostly used by financial institutions or banks to calculate the risk they can take to sell a product in the market. It can predict the likelihood or probability of a certain outcome. Red Hat JBoss BRMS supports additive scorecards that calculates an overall score by adding all partial scores assigned to individual rule conditions.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

truth maintenance system (noun)

Description: A "truth maintenance system" (TMS) refers to the ability of the inference engine to enforce truthfulness when applying rules. The truth maintenance system uses the mechanism of truth maintenance to efficiently handle the inferred information from rules. It provides justified reasoning for each and every action taken by the inference engine and validates the conclusions of the engine. If the inference engine asserts data as a result of firing a rule, the engine uses the truth maintenance to justify the assertion.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

working memory (noun)

Description: "Working memory" is a stateful object that provides temporary storage and enables manipulation of facts. The working memory includes an API that contains methods that enable access to the working memory from rule files.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (noun)

Description: Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform is an enterprise-grade Java application server. Spell out on first use in a guide, and use the approved abbreviation "JBoss EAP" thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Red Hat JBoss EAP, JBoss Enterprise Application Platform

See also: JBoss EAP

JBoss EAP (noun)

Description: JBoss EAP is the approved shortened form of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: EAP, JBoss

ActiveMQ (noun)

Description: ActiveMQ should not be used by itself when referring to the built-in messaging in JBoss EAP.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms: Active MQ, Active-MQ

ActiveMQ Artemis (noun)

Description: The use of ActiveMQ Artemis should only be used where required, such as an overview section on what is under the hood of the built-in JBoss EAP messaging.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: Active MQ Artemis, Active-MQ Artemis

domain mode (noun)

Description: Do not use when referring to the running instance of JBoss EAP server. See managed domain entry for the correct usage.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: managed domain

JBoss EAP messaging (noun)

Description: "JBoss EAP messaging", "JBoss EAP built-in messaging", "built-in messaging" are the appropriate terms for referring to the built-in JBoss EAP messaging.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

management CLI (noun)

Description: This is the correct way to refer to the command-line JBoss EAP management tool. Do not capitalize "management" unless it starts a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: CLI, native interface

See also:

management console (noun)

Description: This is the correct way to refer to the web-based JBoss EAP management console. Do not capitalize "management" unless it starts a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: GUI, HTTP interface

See also:

managed domain (noun)

Description: This is the appropriate way to refer to the managed domain operating mode, for example, "When running the JBoss EAP server in a managed domain".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: domain mode

See also: domain mode

Messaging subsystem (noun)

Description: It is fine to refer to the JBoss EAP 7 "messaging-activemq" subsystem generically as the "messaging subsystem", where appropriate.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

standalone mode (noun)

Description: Do not use to refer to the standalone operating mode of JBoss EAP server.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: standalone server

standalone server (noun)

Description: This is the appropriate way to refer to the standalone operating mode. For example, when running JBoss EAP as a standalone server.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: standalone mode

See also: standalone mode

Web services (noun)

Description: Use as two words.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: webservices

See also:

Windows Server (noun)

Description: This uppercase term is correct when referring to Microsoft’s Windows Server product or Windows-specific commands and scripts like standalone.bat. "Microsoft" does not precede the product name.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Microsoft Windows, Windows

See also:

Red Hat JBoss Fuse

Responsible person: Nichola Moore (nmoore@redhat.com), backup contact fuse-docs@redhat.com.

Camel context (noun)

Description: Every Camel application is based on a CamelContext object, which is Camel’s runtime. The CamelContext object keeps track of and provides access to all services loaded in it (for example, components, endpoints, routes, data formats, languages, the registry, and so on). In the routing context .xml file, it is represented by the <camelContext> element, which encloses all <route> elements and their routing rules. In Camel DSL, CamelContext instantiates a new DefaultCamelContext in which to add and configure routes and their routing rules. Use only when referencing code (element or method), otherwise use the generic term routing context when talking about the application’s .xml/DSL file or the file’s routing rules.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: routing context

canvas (noun)

Description: In Fuse tooling, the route editor provides a canvas (Design tab) on which to build routes graphically, using components and Enterprise Integration Patterns (EIPs) available in the Palette.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: Design tab, EIP

component (noun)

Description: A component is a factory for creating endpoints in a Camel route. For example, you would use the Twitter component to create Twitter endpoints. In Fuse tooling, the Palette’s Components drawer contains the Camel components that you can add to your route in the route editor. Each component represents a connection to a specific service or application, such as Atom, CXF, Bean, File, and so on.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: connection, endpoint

Configurations tab (noun)

Description: In Fuse tooling, the route editor’s Configurations tab enables you to add configuration shared globally by all routes in a multiroute routing context. You can select existing endpoints, data formats, or beans from the list or create and add new ones.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Configurations view

connection (noun)

Description: In Fuse Ignite, you create a connection using a Fuse Ignite connector. You can then use the connection in a Fuse Ignite integration. For example, using the Twitter connector, you can create multiple connections to Twitter, each of which could require unique login credentials.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: connector

connector (noun)

Description: In Fuse Ignite, a connector provides a template for creating any number of connections to a particular application or service, each of which can perform a different operation. A Camel component provides the foundation for a connector. For example, the Twitter connector, built on the Camel Twitter component, enables you to create multiple connections to Twitter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: connection

consumer (noun)

Description: In Camel, a consumer is an endpoint that acts as the source of message exchanges entering a route. It wraps received messages in an exchange and then sends the exchange to the next node in the route. A route can have only one consumer.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Design tab (noun)

Description: In Fuse tooling, the route editor’s Design tab displays a graphical representation of the routing context.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Design view

EIP (noun)

Description: Enterprise Integration Pattern. A pattern language providing a technology-independent vocabulary and visual notation for designing and documenting enterprise integration solutions. Each pattern provides a proven solution for a recurring problem in integrating disparate applications and services across different enterprises. Camel implements numerous patterns for asynchronous messaging. In Fuse tooling, these patterns are located in the Palette and filed in separate drawers according to function (Routing, Control Flow, Transformation, and Miscellaneous).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: component

endpoint (noun)

Description: In Camel, an endpoint provides the starting and terminal ends of a Camel route through which an external system or service can send or receive messages. You use Camel components to create and configure endpoints.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

FUSE_HOME (noun)

Description: Fuse installation directory. Use this when describing which directory to use.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: INSTALL_DIR, installDir

See also:

Fuse Ignite (noun)

Description: Fuse Ignite is the name of the new integration as a service (iPaaS) offering. When writing documentation for Fuse Ignite, do not use common Camel terms such as endpoint, consumer, producer. It is assumed that Fuse Ignite users know nothing about Camel.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Ignite

See also: Syndesis

Fuse tooling (noun)

Description: Fuse tooling is a plugin to Developer Studio that enables rapid design, development, debugging, testing, and publishing of Camel applications on a variety of servers, such as Fuse, EAP, Wildfly, and OpenShift.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

integration (noun)

Description: An integration is a Camel route created in Fuse Ignite.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

message (noun)

Description: In Camel, the message is the fundamental structure for moving data through a route. A message consists of a body (also known as payload), headers, and attachments (optional). Messages flow in one direction from sender to receiver. Headers contain metadata, such as sender IDs, content encoding hints, and so on. Attachments can be text, image, audio, or video files and are typically used with email and web service components.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: message exchange

message exchange (noun)

Description: In Camel, message exchanges deal with conversations and can flow in both directions. They encapsulate messages in containers while the messages are in route to their target endpoints. A message exchange consists of an exchange ID that identifies the conversation, a MEP setting to indicate whether the exchange is one- or two-way (request-reply), an Exception field that is set whenever an error occurs during routing, and global-level properties that users can store/retrieve at any time during the lifecycle of the exchange.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: message, MEP

MEP (noun)

Description: Message Exchange Pattern. In Camel, the MEP is the part of the message exchange that selects between one of two messaging modes: one-way (InOnly) or request-reply (InOut). The default is InOnly.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: message exchange

node (noun)

See node in the General Conventions chapter.

PID (noun)

Description: The persistent identifier (PID) of a registered OSGi service is used to identify the service across container restarts. In Fuse (Karaf), PIDs map to .cfg configuration files located in the FUSE_HOME/etc/ directory. A .cfg file contains a list of attribute/value pairs that configure a service. You can edit any .cfg file to configure/reconfigure the corresponding OSGi service.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

processor (noun)

Description: In a Camel route, a processor is a node that is capable of using, creating, or modifying an incoming message exchange. Processors are typically implementations of EIPs, but can be custom made.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: route, EIP

producer (noun)

Description: In Camel, a producer is an endpoint that acts as the source of messages exiting a route. It can create and send processed messages to their target destination, such as external systems or services. The producer populates the messages it creates with data that is compatible with the target destination. A route can have multiple producers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: consumer

Properties View (noun)

Description: In Fuse tooling, Properties view displays, by default, the properties of the node that is selected on the canvas for editing. It also displays the selected node’s user documentation on the Documentation tab.

Use it:

Incorrect forms: Properties editor

See also:

route (noun)

Description: In Camel, routes specify paths through which messages move. A route is basically a chain of processors that execute actions on messages as they move between the route’s consumer and producer endpoints. A routing context can contain multiple routes.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

route editor (noun)

Description: In Fuse tooling, the route editor is the tool you use to construct the route or routes in your routing context. It provides two methods that you can use interchangeably. You build a context graphically in the Design tab. You code a context in XML in the Source tab.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Camel editor

See also: Design tab, Source tab

routing context (noun)

Description: A routing context specifies the routing rules for a Camel application. Among other things, routing rules specify the source and type of input, how to process it, and where to send the output when processing is done. In Fuse tooling, the routing context is provided in a .xml file, the name of which depends on the configuration framework used. For Spring-based projects, the default name of the routing context file is camelContext.xml. For Blueprint-based projects, the default name of the routing context file is blueprint.xml.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

routing rules (noun)

Description: Routing rules are declarative statements (written in Java or XML DSL) that define the paths which messages take from their origin (source) to their target destination (sink). Routing rules start with a consumer endpoint (from) and typically end with one or more producer endpoints (to). Between consumer and producer endpoints, messages can enter various processors, which may transform them or redirect them to other processors or to specific producer endpoints. In Fuse tooling, you can view and edit a project’s routing rules on the route editor’s Source tab. On the Design tab, you can build and view routing rules graphically.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

Source tab (noun)

Description: In Fuse tooling, the route editor’s Source tab displays the XML code that corresponds to the graphical representation of the routing context displayed on the Design tab. You can edit and save changes to the routing context on either tab. Changes saved on one tab are immediately propagated and saved on the other tab.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Source view

Syndesis (noun)

Description: The community name for Fuse Ignite.

Use it:

Incorrect forms:

See also: Fuse Ignite

URI (noun)

Description: Uniform Resource Identifier. A string of characters that indentifies a resource, it enables interaction with representations of the resource over a network using schemes with specific syntax and associated protocols. In Camel, URIs are used to create and configure endpoints. Camel URIs have a specific syntax: scheme:context_path?options. scheme specifies the component to use to create and handle endpoints of its type; context_path specifies the location of the input data; and options, in the form of property=value pairs, configure the behavior of the created endpoints. For example, the URI file:data/orders?delay=5000 in the consumer endpoint <from uri="file:data/orders?delay=5000" /> employs the File component to create a file endpoint, whose input source, the data/orders directory, will be polled for files at 5 second intervals.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: uri

See also: endpoint, URN

URN (noun)

Description: Uniform Resource Name. A URN is a special URI that identifies, by name, a resource located in a specific namespace. A URN can be used to talk about a resource without implying its location or access details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: urn

See also: URI

Red Hat OpenShift

Responsible person: Ashley Hardin (ahardin@redhat.com), backup contact (openshift-docs@redhat.com)

action (noun)

Description: In the context of authorization in OpenShift, an action consists of project, verb, and resource.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: project, verb, resource

API objects (noun)

Description: API objects are the resources that can be exposed by an API server at an endpoint for interrogation.

Use initial capitalization and camel case for Kubernetes or OpenShift API objects and do not mark them up unless referring to a specific field or variable name from a spec or manifest file.

This matches general Kubernetes usage and makes it obvious that a specific concept is being referred to. For example:

  • Pod

  • Deployment

  • Operator

  • DaemonSet (and not "daemon set", "daemonset", or "Daemonset")

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: API server, endpoint

API server (noun)

Description: A REST API endpoint for interacting with the system. New deployments and configurations can be created with this endpoint, and the state of the system can be interrogated through this endpoint as well. Always mark it properly (apiserver).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: endpoint

application (noun)

Description: Although the term application is not an specific API object type in OpenShift, customers still create and host applications on OpenShift, and using the term within certain contexts is acceptable. For example, the term application might refer to some combination of an image, a Git repository, or a replication controller, and this application might be running PHP, MySQL, Ruby, JBoss, or something else.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: app

authorization (noun)

Description: An authorization determines whether an identity is allowed to perform any action. It consists of identity and action.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: action, identity

build (noun)

Description: The process of transforming input parameters into a resulting object. Most often, the process is used to transform input parameters or source code into a runnable image.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

BuildConfig (noun)

Description: A BuildConfig is an API object that describes a single build definition and a set of triggers for when a new build should be created.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: build, API objects

cluster (noun)

See cluster in the General Conventions part.

container (noun)

See container in the General Conventions part.

controller (noun)

Description: An object that reads APIs, applies changes to other objects, and reports status or write back to the object.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

deployment (noun)

Description: A statement of intent by a user to roll out a new version of a configuration. A replication controller can be used for that and other purposes. All deployments are replication controllers, but not all replication controllers are deployments. To avoid confusion, do not refer to an overall OpenShift installation, instance, or cluster as an "OpenShift deployment".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

DeploymentConfig (noun)

Description: A DeploymentConfig is an API object that contains the details of a particular application deployment: the configuration used in the replication controller definition, such as the number of replicas to ensure; triggers for automatically performing an updated deployment, such as when an image is tagged or the source code in a source-to-image deployment is changed; the strategy for transitioning between deployments when upgrading; and lifecycle hooks.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: API objects

deployment controller (noun)

Description: A Kubernetes object that creates a replication controller from a given Pod template. If that Pod template is modified, the deployment controller creates a new replication controller based on the modified Pod template and replaces the old replication controller with this new one.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Dockerfile (noun)

Description: Docker can build images automatically by reading the instructions from a Dockerfile. A Dockerfile is a text document that contains all the commands you would normally execute manually in order to build a Docker image.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: dockerfile

See also:

endpoint (noun)

Description: The servers that back a service.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

identity (noun)

Description: Both the user name and list of groups the user belongs to.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

image (noun)

Description: An image is a pre-built, binary file that contains all of the necessary components to run a single container; a container is the working instantiation of an image. Additionally, an image defines certain information on how to interact with containers created from the image, such as what ports are exposed by the container. OpenShift uses the same image format as Docker; existing Docker images can easily be used to build containers through OpenShift. Additionally, OpenShift provides a number of ways to build images, either from a Dockerfile or directly from source hosted in a git repository.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

image stream (noun)

Description: A series of Docker images identified by one or more tags. Image streams are capable of aggregating images from a variety of sources into a single view, including images stored in OpenShift’s integrated Docker repository, images from external Docker registries, and other image streams.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: image

init container (noun)

Description: A container that allows you to reorganize setup scripts and binding code. An init container differs from a regular container in that it always runs to completion. Each init container must complete successfully before the next one is started. A Pod can have init containers in addition to application containers.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

kubelet (noun)

Description: The agent that controls a Kubernetes node. Each node runs a kubelet, which handles starting and stopping containers on a node, based on the desired state defined by the master.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Kubelet

See also:

Kubernetes master (noun)

Description: The Kubernetes-native equivalent to the OpenShift master. An OpenShift system runs OpenShift masters, not Kubernetes masters, and an OpenShift master provides a superset of the functionality of a Kubernetes master, so it is generally preferred to use the term OpenShift master.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: OpenShift master

label (noun)

Description: Objects used to organize, group, or select API objects. For example, Pods are "tagged" with labels, and then services use label selectors to identify the Pods they proxy to. This makes it possible for services to reference groups of Pods, even treating Pods with potentially different containers as related entities.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

minion (noun)

Description: Deprecated. Use node instead.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms:

See also: node

namespace (noun)

Description: Typically synonymous with project in OpenShift parlance, which is preferred.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms:

See also: project

node (noun)

See node in the General Conventions part.

OKD (noun)

Description: The name of OpenShift’s open source, upstream project (previously known as OpenShift Origin before August 3, 2018). OKD is a distribution of Kubernetes optimized for continuous application development and multitenant deployment. Officially, the initialism does not stand for anything.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: O.K.D., okd, OpenShift Kubernetes Distribution, OpenShift Origin

See also:

OpenShift (noun)

Description: The OpenShift product name should be paired with its product distribution / variant name whenever possible. For example:

  • OpenShift Container Platform

  • OpenShift Online

  • OpenShift Dedicated

  • OpenShift Container Engine

Previously, the upstream distribution was called OpenShift Origin, however it is now called OKD; use of the OpenShift Origin name is deprecated.

Avoid using the name "OpenShift" on its own when referring to something that applies to all distributions, as OKD does not have OpenShift in its name. However, the following components currently use "OpenShift" in the name and are allowed for use across all distribution documentation:

  • OpenShift Ansible Broker

  • OpenShift Pipeline

  • OpenShift SDN

Use it: yes, as described above

Incorrect forms:

See also: OKD

OpenShift CLI (noun)

Description: The command line interface of OpenShift v3, previously referred to as the client tools in OpenShift v2.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

OpenShift Container Registry (noun)

Description: The integrated container registry that is deployed as part of an OpenShift Container Platform installation. This container registry adds the ability to easily provision new image repositories. This allows users to automatically have a place for their builds to push the resulting images. OpenShift Container Platform has an installation option that allows you to have the OpenShift Container Registry deployed, but with none of the other build options enabled.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

OpenShift master (noun)

Description: Provides a REST endpoint for interacting with the system and manages the state of the system, ensuring that all containers expected to be running are actually running and that other requests such as builds and deployments are serviced. New deployments and configurations are created with the REST API, and the state of the system can be interrogated through this endpoint as well. An OpenShift master comprises the API server, scheduler, and SkyDNS.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

OpenShift Origin (noun)

Description: The previous name of OpenShift’s open source, upstream project. This project has been renamed OKD.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms: OpenShift, Openshift, Origin

See also: OKD

Operator

Description: An Operator is a method of packaging, deploying, and managing a Kubernetes application. A Kubernetes application is an application that is both deployed on a Kubernetes cluster (including OpenShift clusters) and managed using the Kubernetes APIs and kubectl or oc tooling.

While "containerized" is allowed, do not use "Operatorize" to refer to building an Operator that packages an application.

Examples of correct usage:

Install the etcd Operator.

Build an Operator using the Operator SDK.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: operator, operatorize

See also: API objects

Pod (noun)

Description: Pods come from the Kubernetes concept of the same name. A Pod is a set of one or more containers deployed together to act as if they are on a single host, sharing an internal IP, ports, and local storage. It is important to realize that OpenShift treats Pods as immutable. Any changes, be it the underlying image, Pod configuration, or environment variable values, cause new Pods to be created and phase out the existing Pods. Being immutable also means that any state is not maintained between Pods when they are recreated.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: container

project (noun)

Description:An OpenShift project corresponds to a Kubernetes namespace. They are used to organize and group objects in the system, such as Services and DeploymentConfigs, as well as provide security policies specific to those resources.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: action

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (noun)

Description: Red Hat’s private, on-premise cloud application deployment and hosting platform.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: OpenShift, OpenShift CP, Openshift, OCP

See also:

Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated (noun)

Description: Red Hat’s managed public cloud application deployment and hosting service.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Openshift, OpenShift, OD, Dedicated

See also:

Red Hat OpenShift Online (noun)

Description: Red Hat’s public cloud application deployment and hosting platform.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Openshift, OpenShift, Openshift online, OO

See also:

replication controller (noun)

Description: A Kubernetes object used to ensure a specified number of Pods for an application are running at a given time. The replication controller automatically reacts to changes to deployed Pods, both the removal of existing Pods (deletion, crashing, etc.) or the addition of extra Pods that are not desired. The Pods are automatically added or removed from the service to ensure its uptime.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

resource (noun)

Description: The API endpoint being accessed. This is distinct from the referenced resource itself, which can be a Pod, DdeploymentConfig, Build, or other resource.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: endpoint, action, project

route (noun)

Description: A route exposes a service at a host name, like www.example.com, so that external clients can reach it by name.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

service (noun)

Description: A service functions as a load balancer and proxy to underlying Pods. Services are assigned IP addresses and ports and will delegate requests to an appropriate Pod that can field it.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

scheduler (noun)

Description: Component of the Kubernetes master or OpenShift master that manages the state of the system, places Pods on nodes, and ensures that all containers that are expected to be running are actually running.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

SkyDNS (noun)

Description: A component of the Kubernetes master or OpenShift master that provides cluster-wide DNS resolution of internal host names for services and Pods.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

Source-to-Image (S2I) (noun)

Description: A tool for building reproducible, Docker-formatted container images. It produces ready-to-run images by injecting application source into a container image and assembling a new image.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: STI, source to image

See also:

spec (noun)

Description: In addition to "spec file" being allowed related to RPM spec files, general usage of "spec" is allowed when describing Kubernetes or OpenShift object specs / manifests / definitions.

Example of correct usage:

Update the Pod spec to reflect the changes.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Spec

See also:

template (noun)

Description: A template describes a set of objects that can be parameterized and processed to produce a list of objects for creation by OpenShift.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

verb (noun)

Description: A get, list, create, or update operation.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: action, project, resource

Red Hat OpenStack Platform

Responsible person: Petr Kovar (pkovar@redhat.com), backup contact rhos-docs@redhat.com.

Upstream references: OpenStack.org Glossary

director (noun)

Description: Red Hat OpenStack Platform director is a toolset that you can use to install and manage a complete OpenStack environment. Write in lower case. Do not use the article 'the' where appropriate. For example: "Create an OpenStack environment with director.", and "Use the director tool to create an OpenStack environment."

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Director

See also:

instance (noun)

Description: A running virtual machine, or a virtual machine in a known state such as suspended, that can be used like a hardware server. Use the term instance instead of virtual machine unless specifically called out in the user interface or a configuration file.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

OpenStack services (noun)

Description: For definitions of all upstream OpenStack services, see the OpenStack.org Glossary. The following Red Hat OpenStack Platform documentation conventions apply:

  • Use the component name instead of the code name.

    • For example: Block Storage instead of cinder.

  • If the component name includes service, write service in lower case.

    • For example: Identity service.

  • Write the code name in lowercase.

    • For example: nova.

  • Write the component name in upper case.

    • For example: Compute.

  • First instance: Component Name (codename).

    • For example: OpenStack Networking (neutron).

  • Second instance: Component Name.

    • For example: OpenStack Networking.

  • At writer’s discretion: codename.

    • For example: neutron.

  • Exceptions:

    • heat templates (as opposed to Orchestration service template).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

overcloud (noun)

Description: The overcloud is the resulting Red Hat OpenStack Platform environment created using the undercloud. Write in lower case.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Overcloud

See also: undercloud

Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform (noun)

Description: Spell out in full. This product name applies to Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 7 and earlier versions.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: RHELOSP, RHEL-OSP

Red Hat OpenStack Platform (noun)

Description: Spell out in full. This product name applies to Red Hat OpenStack Platform 8 and later versions.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHOS, RHOSP, RH-OSP

undercloud (noun)

Description: The undercloud is the main director node. It is a single-system OpenStack installation that includes components for provisioning and managing the OpenStack nodes that form your OpenStack environment (the overcloud). Write in lower case.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Undercloud

See also: overcloud, node

Red Hat Satellite 6

Responsible person: Stephen Wadeley (swadeley@redhat.com), backup contact (satellite-doc-list@redhat.com)

Capsule Server (noun)

Description: Capsule Server is an additional server that acts as a proxy to the Satellite and can provide services such as DHCP, DNS, and TFTP. Use the two-word name on first use in a section; the single term 'Capsule' is acceptable thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Capsule server, capsule

See also:

Content View (noun)

Description: A Content View is a subset of Library content created by intelligent filtering. Use the two-word name in full on first use in a section; the abbreviation 'CV' is acceptable thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Content view, content view

Composite Content View (noun)

Description: A Composite Content View is a collection of Content Views. Use the three-word name in full on first use in a section; the abbreviation 'CVV' is acceptable thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Composite Content view, composite content view, Composite View, composite view

See also: Content View

Facter (noun)

Description: Facter is Puppet’s system inventory tool.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: facter

See also:

Subscription Manifest (noun)

Description: A Subscription Manifest is a mechanism for transferring subscriptions from Red Hat Customer Portal to Red Hat Satellite 6. Use the two-word name in full on first use in a section; the word 'manifest' is acceptable thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Subscription manifest

See also:

Puppet (noun)

Description: Puppet is a tool for applying and managing system configurations.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: puppet

See also:

Puppetize (verb)

Description: To apply Puppet manifests and methods to a system. This is unnecessary industry jargon or slang.

Use it: no

Incorrect forms: puppetize

See also: Puppet

Puppet Forge (noun)

Description: Puppet Forge is a Puppet Labs git repository for community supplied Puppet modules.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: puppet forge

See also:

Product (noun)

Description: A Red Hat Satellite Product is a collection of repositories.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: product

See also:

Satellite Server (noun)

Description: Satellite Server synchronizes the content from Red Hat Customer Portal and other sources, and provides life cycle management, user and group role-based access control, integrated subscription management, as well as GUI, CLI, and API access. It is the core component of Red Hat Satellite, the systems management tool for Linux-based infrastructure. Use the two-word name on first use in a section; the single term 'Satellite' is acceptable thereafter.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Satellite server

See also:

Foreman (noun)

Description: The upstream project from which Satellite Server’s provisioning and life cycle management functions are drawn. Use only when required to mention the upstream project. In Red Hat Virtualization use Foreman/Satellite when referring directly to the UI element. Do not use Foreman or Foreman/Satellite to refer to Red Hat Satellite in other cases. A bug is open to get this element changed to Satellite. (BZ#1428205 Change Foreman/Satellite to Satellite)

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: foreman

See also:

Katello (noun)

Description: The upstream project from which Satellite Server’s subscription and repository management functions are drawn. Use only when required to mention the upstream project.

Use it: with caution

Incorrect forms: katello

See also:

Red Hat Virtualization

Responsible person: Tahlia Richardson (trichard@redhat.com), backup contact rhev-docs@redhat.com

Administration Portal (noun)

Description: The Administration Portal is a graphical user interface provided by the Red Hat (Enterprise) Virtualization Manager. It can be used to manage all the administrative resources in the environment and can be accessed by any supported web browser.

Always use "Administration Portal", including the capital P. When other departments (or upstream) use "webadmin" or "Administrator portal", this is what they are referring to.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Admin Portal, webadmin, webadmin portal, Administrator Portal, Administration portal

See also: User Portal

Cockpit web interface (noun)

Description: Cockpit is a web-based server administration user interface, and is not exclusive to Red Hat Virtualization. It can be used as a plug-in with either host type in Red Hat Virtualization (version 4.x).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

collect (verb)

Description: Use "collect" when discussing the Red Hat Virtualization log collector (ovirt-log-collector). Do not use "gather", which is reserved for discussing Red Hat Virtualization metrics. See the comments in BZ#1418659 Add fluentd configuration for parsing engine.log for the discussion regarding this decision.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: gather

See also: gather

Data Warehouse (noun)

Description: The Manager includes a comprehensive management history database, which can be utilized by any application to extract a range of information at the data center, cluster, and host levels. Installing Data Warehouse creates the ovirt_engine_history database, to which the Manager is configured to log information for reporting purposes.

Data Warehouse is optional in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (3.x). It is mandatory in Red Hat Virtualization (4.x).

Always spell out in full and capitalize as shown here, unless part of a command. Use "Data Warehouse", not "the Data Warehouse", unless referring to "the Data Warehouse package", "the Data Warehouse service", etc.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: DWH, data warehouse, Dataware House

See also:

details pane (noun)

Description: The details pane shows detailed information about a selected item in the results list. If no items are selected, this pane is hidden. If multiple items are selected, the details pane displays information on the first selected item only. For a visual example, see Graphical User Interface Elements in the Introduction to the Administration Portal. The screen shot applies to Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 and earlier versions (including 3.x).

Tabs in the details pane are always referred to as, for example, "the General tab in the details pane". This terminology only applies to Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 and earlier. In 4.2 and later, use "details view".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

details view (noun)

Description: The details view shows detailed information about a selected item. This terminology only applies to Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 and later, where this information is no longer in a pane, but on a separate page accessed by clicking the name of the item. In 4.1 and earlier, use "details pane".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: details pane

See also: details pane

gather (verb)

Description: Use "gather" when discussing Red Hat Virtualization metrics. Do not use "collect", which is reserved for discussing the Red Hat Virtualization log collector (ovirt-log-collector). See the comments in BZ#1418659 Add fluentd configuration for parsing engine.log for the discussion regarding this decision.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: collect

See also: collect

header bar (noun)

Description: The header bar contains the name of the currently logged in user, the Sign Out button, the About button, the Configure button, and the Guide button. For a visual example, see Graphical User Interface Elements in the Introduction to the Administration Portal. The screen shot applies to Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 and earlier versions (including 3.x).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: title bar

See also:

host (noun)

Description: Hosts are servers that provide the processing capabilities and memory resources used to run virtual machines. There are two types of hosts: Red Hat Enterprise Linux hosts, and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor (in version 3.x) or Red Hat Virtualization Host (in version 4.x).

Use "host" to refer to hosts in general, not "hypervisor", "hypervisor host", or "virtualization host". When referring to a specific type of host, use "Red Hat Enterprise Linux host", "Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor host", or "Red Hat Virtualization Host".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hypervisor, hypervisor host, virtualization host

LUN (noun)

Description: A LUN (logical unit number) is a number used to identify a logical unit, which is a device addressed by the SCSI protocol, or Storage Area Network protocols which encapsulate SCSI, such as Fibre Channel or iSCSI.

Always capitalize as shown, with the exception of UI content.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Lun, lun

See also:

Manager virtual machine (noun)

Description: "Manager virtual machine" refers specifically to the virtual machine created during self-hosted engine deployment. Use this term when referring to the machine (for example, "Log in to the Manager virtual machine"); the Manager itself can still be referred to as such (for example, "Add a host to the Manager").

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: self-hosted engine virtual machine, engine VM

See also: self-hosted engine

MOM (noun)

Description: The Memory Overcommitment Manager is a policy-driven tool that can be used to manage overcommitment on hosts.

Use "Memory Overcommitment Manager (MOM)" for the first instance in a section, and "MOM" for subsequent instances.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: MoM, Mom, mom

See also:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux host (noun)

Description: Red Hat Enterprise Linux servers subscribed to the appropriate entitlements can be used as hosts in both Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (version 3.x) and Red Hat Virtualization (version 4.x).

Always spell out in full. Do not capitalize "host".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHEL host, RHEL-H

See also: host

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (noun)

Description: Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization is an enterprise-grade server and desktop virtualization platform built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Use "Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization" for version 3.x (including references to these versions in version 4.x guides). Always spell out in full, except as part of "RHEV-H".

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHEV

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor (noun)

Description: Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor is one of the types of host in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (3.x). It is a minimal operating system based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, is distributed as an ISO file, and is a closed system. File system access and root access are limited. yum is disabled.

Use "Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor (RHEV-H)" for the first instance in a section. "RHEV-H" can be used for subsequent instances. It can also be referred to as "the Hypervisor", as long as the H is capitalized to avoid confusion with hypervisors in general. Do not use in Red Hat Virtualization 4.x.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHEVH, Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Host, RHEV Hypervisor

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Manager (noun)

Description: The Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Manager is a server that manages and provides access to the resources in the Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization environment.

Use "Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Manager" for version 3.x. Spell out in full for the first instance in a section. Use "the Manager" for subsequent instances. Do not use "the engine", which is the oVirt (upstream) term.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHEVM, RHEV-M, RHEV Manager, engine

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Manager Reports (noun)

Description: Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Manager Reports is available as an optional component. It produces reports that can be built and accessed via a web user interface, and then rendered to screen, printed, or exported to a variety of formats.

This component was removed from Red Hat Virtualization (4.x), but still exists in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (3.x).

Spell out in full for the first instance in a section, and use "Reports" (always with a capital R) for subsequent instances.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHEVM Reports

See also:

Red Hat Virtualization (noun)

Description: Red Hat Virtualization is an enterprise-grade server and desktop virtualization platform built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Use "Red Hat Virtualization" for version 4.x. Always spell out in full, except as part of "RHVH" or when repetition in a single paragraph hampers readability.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHV

Red Hat Virtualization Host (noun)

Description: Red Hat Virtualization Host is one of the types of host in Red Hat Virtualization (4.x). It is a minimal operating system based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, is distributed as an ISO file from the Customer Portal, and contains only the packages required for the machine to act as a host. It is an improved version of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor.

Use "Red Hat Virtualization Host (RHVH)" for the first instance in a section. "RHVH" can be used in subsequent instances. Do not use "the Host" with a capital H. Do not use in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.x.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHV-H, Red Hat Virtualization Hypervisor, RHV Host, the Host

Red Hat Virtualization Manager (noun)

Description: The Red Hat Virtualization Manager is a server that manages and provides access to the resources in the Red Hat Virtualization environment.

Use "Red Hat Virtualization Manager" for version 4.x. Spell out in full for the first instance in a section. Use "the Manager" for subsequent instances. Do not use "the engine", which is the oVirt (upstream) term.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: RHVM, RHV-M, RHV Manager, engine

resource tab (noun)

Description: Hosts, virtual machines, storage, and other resources in Red Hat Virtualization can be managed using their associated tab. For a visual example, see Graphical User Interface Elements in the Introduction to the Administration Portal. The screen shot applies to Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 and earlier versions (including 3.x).

You can refer to these tabs as just, for example, "the Storage tab", unlike the tabs in the details pane, which are always specified as such.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: details pane

results list (noun)

Description: The results list shows the resources managed under each resource tab. For example, the results list for the Hosts tab shows all hosts attached to the Red Hat Virtualization Manager. For a visual example, see Graphical User Interface Elements in the Introduction to the Administration Portal. The screen shot applies to Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 and earlier versions (including 3.x).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: resource tab

self-hosted engine (noun)

Description: A self-hosted engine is a virtualized environment in which the Manager, or engine, runs on a virtual machine on the hosts managed by that Manager. The virtual machine is created as part of the host configuration, and the Manager is installed and configured in parallel to the host configuration process.

Use all lower case, unless used in a title or at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hosted engine, hosted-engine

self-hosted engine node (noun)

Description: A self-hosted engine is a virtualized environment in which the Manager, or engine, runs on a virtual machine on the hosts managed by that Manager. A self-hosted engine node is a host that has self-hosted engine packages installed so that it can host the Manager virtual machine. Regular hosts can also be attached to a self-hosted engine environment, but cannot host the Manager virtual machine.

Use all lower case, unless used in a title or at the beginning of a sentence.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: hosted engine host, hosted-engine host, self-hosted engine host, hosted engine node, hosted-engine node

See also: self-hosted engine

sparse (adjective)

Description: A disk is sparse when its unused disk space is taken from the virtual machine and returned to the host. In the past, the term sparse has been used to describe thin provisioned storage; however, with the addition of the sparsify feature in Red Hat Virtualization 4.1, these terms should not be used interchangeably as a thin provisioned disk may not be a sparse disk.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

sparsify (verb)

Description: To take unused disk space from a virtual machine and return it to the host.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also: sparse

SPICE (noun)

Description: SPICE stands for "Simple Protocol for Independent Computing Environments". It is a remote connection protocol for viewing a virtual machine in a graphical console from a remote client.

Always capitalize as shown, except in commands, packages, or UI content.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: Spice, spice

See also:

standalone Manager (noun)

Description: "Standalone Manager" is used specifically, and only, in the context of differentiating between a "regular" Red Hat Virtualization environment and a self-hosted engine environment. Use "the Red Hat Virtualization Manager" or "the Manager" in all other cases. See the Red Hat Virtualization Product Guide for details.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: standard Manager, standard environment

Storage Pool Manager (noun)

Description: The Storage Pool Manager (SPM) is a role given to one of the hosts in a data center, enabling it to manage the storage domains of the data center.

Use "Storage Pool Manager (SPM)" for the first instance in a section, and "SPM" for subsequent instances.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms:

See also:

sub-version (noun)

Description: A template sub-version is a new template version created from an existing template.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: sub version, subversion

See also:

sysprep (noun)

Description: Sysprep is a tool used to automate the setup of Windows virtual machines. Red Hat Virtualization enhances Sysprep by building a tailored auto-answer file for each virtual machine.

With the exception of "sysprep file", which has a specific function, use "sysprep" on its own when referring to the tool.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: sysprep tool, sysprep process, sysprep function

See also:

tree pane (noun)

Description: The collapsible hierarchy of resources under System on the left-hand side of the Administration Portal. For a visual example, see Graphical User Interface Elements in the Introduction to the Administration Portal. The screen shot applies to Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 and earlier versions (including 3.x).

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: System pane, system pane

See also:

User Portal (noun)

Description: The User Portal is a graphical user interface provided by the Red Hat (Enterprise) Virtualization Manager in versions 4.1 and earlier. It has limited permissions for managing virtual machine resources and is targeted at end users.

Always use "User Portal", including the capital P. Do not use in Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 and later, where the User Portal was replaced by the VM Portal.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: userportal, user portal, User portal, VM Portal

VM Portal (noun)

Description: The VM Portal is a graphical user interface provided by the Red Hat Virtualization Manager in versions 4.2 and later. It has limited permissions for managing virtual machine resources and is targeted at end users.

Always use "VM Portal", including the capital P. Do not use in Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 and earlier, where it did not yet exist; use "User Portal" instead.

Use it: yes

Incorrect forms: VM portal, vm portal, Virtual Machine Portal, User Portal